Paul T. Hill

Paul T. Hill is the founder of the Center on Reinventing Public Education and a research professor at the University of Washington Bothell. More

Paul T. Hill is the founder of the Center on Reinventing Public Education and a research professor at the University of Washington Bothell. His current work focuses on re-missioning states and school districts to promote school performance, choice and innovation, and finance and productivity. He leads the Portfolio School Districts Project and has built a national network of school district officials, mayors, foundations, nonprofits, and others who are pursuing the portfolio strategy. He also chaired the National Working Commission on Choice in K-12 Education. 

Hill's books include Strife and Progress: Portfolio Strategies for Managing Urban Schools (2012), Learning as We Go: Why School Choice Is Worth the Wait (2010), Making School Reform Work: New Partnerships for Real Change (2004), Charter Schools and Accountability in Public Education (2002), It Takes A City: Getting Serious About Urban School Reform (2000), and Fixing Urban Schools (1998). He is editor (with Julian Betts) of Taking Measure of Charter Schools: Better Assessments, Better PolicymakingBetter Schools (2010) and Charter Schools Against the Odds (2006). He is a distinguished visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution and a member of the Koret Task Force on K-12 Education. He holds a Ph.D. and M.A. from Ohio State University and a B.A. from Seattle University, all in political science.

Paul T. Hill: Magazine articles

No entries found

Video

Never Tell People How Old They Look

Age discrimination affects us all. James Hamblin turns to a colleague for advice.

Video

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

Video

Pittsburgh: 'Better Than You Thought'

How Steel City became a bikeable, walkable paradise

Video

A Four-Dimensional Tour of Boston

In this groundbreaking video, time moves at multiple speeds within a single frame.

Video

Who Made Pop Music So Repetitive? You Did.

If pop music is too homogenous, that's because listeners want it that way.

Writers

Up
Down

Just In