This Month in The Atlantic's History

June 2006

65 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Cloud, Castle, Lake (June 1941)
In 1941, The Atlantic became the first English-language magazine to publish fiction by Vladimir Nabokov.

May 2006

100 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Camping with President Roosevelt (May 1906)
In 1906, the acclaimed naturalist John Burroughs fondly recalled a camping trip with his friend President Roosevelt.

35 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Obsolescent Mother (May 1971)
In 1971, Edward Grossman suggested that artificial wombs might soon make pregnancy unnecessary.

April 2006

80 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Weaker Sex: A Scientific Ramble (April 1926)
"Whatever success [women] may have obtained, the facts continue to be against their claim of mental equality." In 1926, an eminent psychologist expounded on the deficiencies of the female sex.

March 2006

40 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Marlon Brando: An American Hero (March 1966)
"He was our angry young man—the delinquent, the tough, the rebel." In 1966, Pauline Kael considered the rise and fall of an American screen legend.

February 2006

25 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Of Sex and the Catholic Church (February 1981)
"A misogynistic prejudice has pervaded the Church's moral thought down through the ages." A report from the bishops' synod on the Christian family, by Father Francis X. Murphy.

50 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Can Men Live Without War? (February 1956)
In 1956, Vannevar Bush predicted optimistically that "the end of all war is now definitely in sight for the first time in human history."

January 2006

45 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Are Americans Well Adjusted? (January 1961)
In 1961, Charles Rolo reported on the state of Americans' mental health.

December 2005

25 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Fate of the Movies (December 1980)
In 1980, Roger Ebert expressed concern about the impact of television on the movies.

November 2005

135 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Captain Kidd's Money (November 1870)
In 1870, Harriet Beecher Stowe penned a ghost story about buried pirate treasure for the pages of The Atlantic.

85 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Islam (November 1920)
In 1920, a British diplomat described his impressions of Islam and his thoughts on the prospects for Western-style government in the Middle East.

45 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
For the Union Dead (November 1960)
In 1960, Robert Lowell's famous poem in honor of Civil War Colonel Robert Gould Shaw appeared in the pages of The Atlantic Monthly.

October 2005

25 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Deadlock: What Happens If Nobody Wins (OctoberĘ1980)
Two decades before the infamous Presidential election of 2000, two Atlantic authors considered what would happen in the event of "an election that fails to elect."

September 2005

20 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
House (September 1985)
In a 1985 article later expanded into an acclaimed book, Tracy Kidder told the story of a young couple, an architect, and four carpenters.

August 2005

45 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Social Security Bill: 25 Years After (August 1960)
"The bill became law on August 14, 1935. No one could be sure that it would last." In 1960 Thomas H. Eliot reminisced about his time as counsel for the committee that drafted the Social Security Bill.

July 2005

145 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Darwin on the Origin of Species (July 1860)
"New notions and new styles worry us, till we get well used to them, which is only by slow degrees." Shortly after its first publication, botanist Asa Gray reviewed Charles Darwin's The Origin of Species.

June 2005

85 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The League of Nations is Alive (June 1920)
"The time is long since past when any country can isolate itself from the economic security or chaos of the rest of the world." In 1920 Raymond Fosdick issued a glowing assessment of a young League of Nations.

50 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Albert Einstein: Appraisal of an Intellect (June 1955)
"They are saying that such minds come on the human scene only once in a hundred years, but this is an understatement." Two months after Einstein's death, an MIT dean reflected on his life and work.

125 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
A Telephonic Conversation (June 1880)
"I touched the bell and this talk ensued." In 1880 Mark Twain expressed bemusement over his recently installed telephone.

10 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
How to Save Social Security (June 1995)
"Without reform the Social Security trust fund will eventually be gone." In 1995, The Atlantic's editors envisioned a solution.

May 2005

25 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Afghanistan: Crossroads of Conflict (May 1980)
"A strong argument certainly exists for radical change." In 1980 Jonathan Quitny reported on the problems of poverty, ill health, and illiteracy in Afghanistan.

25 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Miracle at Kitty Hawk (May 1950)
"For some years I have been afflicted with the belief that flight is possible to man." In 1950 The Atlantic published a collection of the Wright brothers' correspondence.

25 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Paradoxical Pope (May 1980)
"It is early in his pontificate to make broad judgments about John Paul II." In 1980 Kati Marton assessed the then-new leader of the Catholic church.

April 2005

145 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Bardic Symbols (April 1860)
In an 1860 poem, Walt Whitman expressed concern about the reception of his controversial poetry collection, Leaves of Grass.

20 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Road to Hill 10 (April 1985)
"That tree line had meant ambush and death. Now the scene was a peaceful Asian landscape, a nice place to have a picnic." In 1985, veteran William Broyles described his return to Vietnam.

50 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Jukebox on Wheels (April 1955)
"Now, what are cars in the year 2005 going to look like?" Fifty years ago this month, auto designer Raymond Loewy speculated about the cars of today.

March 2005

105 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Growth of Our Foreign Policy (March 1900)
"The United States has ceased to be a hermit among the nations, naturally and properly. What was not necessary is that it should at the same time become a colonizing Power." By Richard Olney

130 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Is Marriage Holy? (March 1875)
In 1865, Henry James Sr. offered advice on how to respond to a spouse's infidelity.

40 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Churchill at the White House (March 1965)
"It was astonishing to me that anyone could smoke so much and drink so much and keep perfectly well." In 1965, Eleanor Roosevelt reminisced about Winston Churchill's visits to the White House.

35 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The High Cost of Cure (March 1970)
How a hospital bill grows 17 feet long. By Michael Crichton.

February 2005

85 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
New Light on Lincoln's Boyhood (February 1920)
In 1909 a civil engineer passing through a remote town in the Ozarks stumbled upon a family that had known Abraham Lincoln in his childhood. In 1920 he shared some of their stories with The Atlantic.

20 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Translating the Bible (February 1985)
"For the uninformed consumer, shopping for the right Bible is a bit like buying a stereo system: the multiplicity of choices is bewildering."

10 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Street Scene (February 1995)
"On a Saturday morning I left my Brooklyn apartment to shop for a dinner party and saw a crowd..." In 1995 Ian Frazier shared a heartwarming New York City vignette.

January 2005

90 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Class-Consciousness and the "Movies" (January 1915)
"[Movies] dull the imagination and destroy the illusive romance of art. They are utterly incapable of intellectual content." In 1915 Walter Prichard Eaton warned of a new threat to high culture.

15 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The In-Box President (January 1990)
"With Bush the rule seems to be no ideological hard-liners, no Evil Empire-baiters, no economic cranks.... And no bold new ideas." In 1990 William Schneider critiqued the presidency of George H. W. Bush.

60 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Slums and City Planning (January 1945)
"Real-estate operators are only just beginning to recognize their responsibilities." In 1945 the legendary New York developer Robert Moses shared his thoughts on urban renewal.

December 2004

100 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Emerson (December 1904)
"I ... found myself thinking: if this man were only a woman, I should be sure to fall in love with him." In 1904 Henry James Sr. recalled his dramatic first impression of Ralph Waldo Emerson.

135 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Innocents Abroad (December 1869)
"Under his nom de plume of Mark Twain, Mr. Clements is well known.... This book ought to secure him something better than the uncertain standing of a popular favorite." In 1869 William Dean Howells reviewed Mark Twain's first book.

10 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Must It Be the Rest Against the West? (December 1994)
"The richer societies need to recognize that John Donne's reasoning applies on an international scale. 'No man is an island, entire of itself.'" In 1994, two historians argued that the consequences of failing to narrow the gap between rich and poor countries could be dire.

125 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Three Interviews With Old John Brown (December 1879)
In 1879 William Addison Phillips recalled conversations with John Brown, the abolitionist who led massacres of pro-slavery families in Kansas and orchestrated a famous 1859 raid on the federal arsenal at Harper's Ferry, Virgina.

November 2004

15 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Suffer the Restless Children (November 1989)
In 1989 Alfie Kohn, a human behavior and education theorist, suggested that ADHD is a dubious diagnosis, and that Ritalin is too readily prescribed.

130 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
A True Story, Repeated Word for Word As I Heard It (November 1874)
Mark Twain's first contribution to The Atlantic Monthly.

20 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Big Business in Ballots (November 1984)
"Standing behind the curtains makes voting seem wonderfully mysterious. It lends to the act the aura of Confession." In 1984 Cullen Murphy commented on the varieties of voting experience.

October 2004

40 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The 1964 Election (October 1964)
"In the election this fall, which will go far to determine the conduct of the United States in the next twenty-five years, we stand for the election of President Lyndon B. Johnson." An editorial by The Atlantic's editor in chief.

25 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Mass Transit Panacea and Other Fallacies About Energy (October 1979)
"The 'energy problem' is now the longest running show in Washington." After a summer of high oil prices and long gas lines, Charles A. Lave weighed the benefits of public transportation and synthetic fuels.

35 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Fight for the President's Mind (October 1969)
"The inner core of the Administration was frozen solid in misconceptions." In 1969 Townsend Hoopes, the Undersecretary of the Air Force, recounted the battle to persuade President Johnson to scale back the Vietnam War.

September 2004

55 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Mr. Churchill (September 1949)
In 1949 Isaiah Berlin lauded Winston Churchill as "a legendary hero who belongs to myth as much as to reality"—and defended against the charge that Churchill's writings were windy and self-aggrandizing.

10 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
How We Become What We Are (September 1994)
"There are many good things about being, say, introverted—think of Wittgenstein. But now the cultural ideal is Bill Clinton." In 1994 Winifred Gallagher reported on the science of human temperament.

August 2004

100 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The House of the Dead Hand (August 1904)
"The hand was a woman's—a dead drooping hand, which hung helpless as though it had been thrust forth in denunciation of some evil mystery within the house." A short story by Edith Wharton.

30 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Computers Aren't So Smart, After All (August 1974)
"Every culture has its misdirected enthusiasms which fail dramatically. The great computer craze of the late fifties and the sixties is such a case." In 1974 Fred Hapgood dismissed artificial intelligence as a passing fad.

July 2004

85 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
A Jewish Palestine (July 1919)
"The Jewish Palestine will be the home of many experiments. It will strive to replace the broken tyranny of the Turk by a harmonious cooperation between Jew, Arab, and Armenian." In 1919 H. Sacher forecast a peaceful future for a Jewish homeland.

35 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Student Politics and the University (July 1969)
"Would the university become the recruiting and launching ground for radical political activity directed to the overthrow of a democratic society?" In 1969 Nathan Glazer pondered the problem of student rebellion on American campuses.

90 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Meditations on Votes for Women (July 1914)
"Multitudes of educated women are in influential positions, moulding public sentiment and directing large institutions. All the functions of citizenship they actually exercise except that of voting." In 1914 Samuel McChord Crothers advocated suffrage for women.

15 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
A Toxic Ghost Town (July 1989)
"Today Love Canal is a forty-acre mound of clay ringed by warning signs, a high chain-link fence, and a drainage trench." In 1989 Michael H. Brown revisited the site of one of America's most notorious toxic waste crises.

June 2004

145 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Stereoscope and the Stereograph (June 1859)
"Form is henceforth divorced from matter. Give us a few negatives of a thing, and that is all we want of it." In 1859 Oliver Wendell Holmes famously proclaimed that our relationship to art and the world around us had been forever altered.

45 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
American Planes: The Lessons of History (June 1959)
"Some clear and not too pleasant lessons are to be learned from a reflective perusal of the more than half century in which we have developed our air travel." In 1959 an aircraft engineer criticized the slow pace of progress in aviation.

25 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Nuclear Age (June 1979)
"Nobody wanted to pray, but each of us blessed the bomb without guilt, and Sarah chanted, 'Fission, fusion, critical mass.'" A short story by Tim O'Brien.

35 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Right of Abortion (June 1969)
"We continue to maintain strict antiabortion laws on the books, denying freedom of choice to women and physicians and compelling the 'unwilling to bear the unwanted.'" In 1969 a Manhattan lawyer argued in favor of abortion rights.

May 2004

5 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Napoleon in Rags (May 1999)
"There was no rock style of the late sixties or early seventies that Dylan didn't touch in some way, no matter how alien its aesthetic might have seemed to him." In 1999, Francis Davis considered Bob Dylan's influence on today's music scene.

100 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Diplomatic Contest for the Mississippi Valley (May 1904)
"If the Declaration of Independence marks our separation from the colonial system of the Old World, the Louisiana Purchase was the turning-point in the events that fixed our position as the arbiter of the New World." In 1904, Frederick J. Turner traced the early years of America's westward expansion.

40 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Mad Strangler of Boston (May 1964)
"But the victims... submitted to murder as meekly as though they had been hypnotized and told the fatal stocking being placed around their necks was actually a pearl necklace." Perry Mason creator Erle Stanley Gardner on the case of the Boston Strangler.

April 2004

45 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Sacrificial Egg (April 1959)
"Someone oppressed by misfortune had brought the offering to the crossroads in the dusk. And he had stepped on it and taken the sufferer's ill luck to himself." From 1959, Chinua Achebe's first short story to be published in the United States.

25 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Iraq (April 1979)
"The visual contrasts in Iraq are jarring: on the one hand, traces of Babylon, Assyria, and Sumeria; on the other, the most advanced plutonium breeder reactor." In 1979, Claudia Wright profiled Iraq as an emergent power in the Middle East.

March 2004

40 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
What Happened to Women's Rights (March 1964)
"The one 'right' which women have always had, frequently scorned, never fought for, is the one to which they now rush in fevered haste, the right to get married." In 1964 Paul Foley lamented the stagnation of the women's movement.

20 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Saint Marie (March 1984)
"Sometimes I wanted her heart in love and admiration. Sometimes. And sometimes I wanted her heart to roast on a black stick." From 1984, a short story by Louise Erdrich.

65 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
What Makes an American (March 1939)
"Nothing is more assuredly un-American than to entertain any doubt concerning the fact that somehow or another this country will come out all right." In 1939, Raoul de Roussy de Sales explored the unique ethos at the core of American nationalism.

90 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Newspaper Morals (March 1914)
"The chief appeal of a newspaper is not at all to the educated and reflective minority of citizens, but to the ignorant and unreflective majority." In 1914, H.L. Mencken argued that successful journalism must inflame the sensibilities of the everyman.

February 2004

40 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Is There a New Germany? (February 1964)
"Until Germans really believe that each man is responsible for his acts and his conscience, and that orders are not their own justification, Germany merely changes its leaders, not its character." In 1964, Martha Gellhorn inveighed against Germany's post-war generation.

65 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Robert Moses: An Atlantic Portrait (February 1939)
Cleveland Rodgers draws an early sketch of New York's urban czar, "the man who, in less than five years, has remade or refurbished a considerable portion of the metropolis."

20 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Freud and the Seduction Theory (February 1984)
"Freud's announcement of his new discoveries in the 1896 address on the etiology of hysteria met with no reasoned refutation or scientific discussion, only disgust and disavowal." In 1984 Jeffrey M. Masson unearthed the melodrama behind Freud's renunciation of his controversial seduction theory.

135 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Proud Music of the Sea Storm (February 1869)
"What thou has heard, O Soul, was not the sound of winds, Nor dream of stormy waves ... [But] Poems, vaguely wafted in night air, uncaught, unwritten, Which, let us go forth in the bold day, and write." For Walt Whitman, the music of a storm evokes a new poetic "rhythmus."

January 2004

100 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Scab (January 1904)
"Capitalist and labor groups are locked together in desperate battle, and neither side is swayed by moral considerations more than skin-deep." In 1904 the novelist Jack London examined how scab labor came to be an integral part of the American economy.

5 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
What Is the Koran? (January 1999)
"If Christ is the Word of God made flesh, the Koran is the Word of God made text, and questioning its sanctity or authority is thus considered an outright attack on Islam." In 1999, Toby Lester explored 20th-century research into Islamic history and the Koran.

50 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
New England and the South (January 1954)
"When other areas, in Latin America and Asia, are industrially developed, the South will suffer the same pangs of aging now suffered by New England." In 1958 Senator John F. Kennedy proposed solutions to unfair wage and tax practices driving job migration within the U.S.

December 2003

20 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Blinding Light of the Mind (December 1983)
"His fear was like a large cardboard box inside his head, empty but bulky, leaving room for little else." A short story by Jane Smiley.

45 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Lesson of Iraq (December 1958)
"What is it that we have really lost in Iraq? This question does not admit of easy answers, partly because we never decided what was our essential aim there." In 1958, William R. Polk discussed America's response to a recent coup d'état in Iraq.

November 2003

105 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Among the Birds of the Yosemite (November 1898)
"Nature-lovers, devout, silent, open-eyed, looking and listening with love, find no lack of inhabitants in these mountain mansions." From cranes to quail, John Muir described the birds of Yosemite park.

30 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Force That Drives the Flower (November 1973)
"It is not one monarch butterfly I see, but a thousand. I myself am not one, but legion. And we are all going to die." In 1973, Annie Dillard explored what "appalled" her about nature's fecundity.

October 2003

50 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Movies and TV: Murder or Merger? (October 1953)
"The world of visual entertainment is in a turmoil." In 1953, John T. Rule discussed whether the motion-picture industry and television could co-exist, and what their ultimate relationship might be.

35 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The War Against the Young (October 1968)
"Our society is unfortunately structured in ways designed to suppress some of the most vital elements now struggling into consciousness and toward some awareness of their frustrated powers." In 1968, as the anti-war movement gained steam, Richard Poirier examined the importance of "rebellious youth" to society.

20 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Papa Lives (October 1983)
"Hemingway can sustain a breathless pace for chapters at a time, piling image upon image, scene upon scene. He isn't a leisurely read." In 1983, James Atlas critically examined Hemingway's four best-known works.

55 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Democrats Can Win (October 1948)
"The growing tensions within the Democratic Party and the world-wide feeling of insecurity present three questions about American politics. Can the Democratic Party win in 1948? Will the Democratic Party hold it together? If it does not, what will happen?" In 1948, a leading Democrat discussed his party's chances.

September 2003

50 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Our Mistakes in Korea (September 1953)
"Quite a few things enter into the prevention of world war and the preserving of peace. It's infinitely helpful when the strongest power acts both willing and resolute." In 1953 General S.L.A. Marshall discussed America's ineffectual efforts in the Korean War and made a case for "steadiness" and "rugged realism" in U.S. foreign policy.

15 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Driven Toward God (September 1988)
"For the moment, pro-American feelings are widespread in Afghanistan. If such an attitude is to last, American officials would do well to steer clear of Afghan politics." In 1988, soon before the Soviets' withdrawal from Afghanistan, Robert Kaplan analyzed the political future of the war-torn country.

100 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Why Women Do Not Wish the Suffrage (September 1903)
"Woman does not wish to turn aside from her higher work, which is itself the end of life, to devote herself to government, which exists only that this higher work may be done. Can she not do both? No!" In 1903, Lyman Abbott argued that women had no interest in political involvement.

August 2003

50 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Byron and the Byronic (August 1953)
"Byron's thoughts, works, and character cannot be adequately summed up in the figure of a headlong lover in an open collar, whose fits of melancholy are a pose." In 1953, Jacques Barzun argued that there was much more to Byron than his romantic image.

15 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Babes in Day Care (August 1988)
"The misguided impression remains that the study scientifically established what many of us secretly fear to be true: that mothers of infants who do not devote at least most of their time to child-rearing risk compromising their children." An examination of the controversy over whether day care harms infants.

145 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Singing-Birds and Their Songs (August 1858)
"When a young person has suffered any severe wound of the affections, he seldom fails, if endowed with a sensitive mind, to listen to the birds as sharers in his affliction." In 1858, Wilson Flagg examined the everyday contributions of our feathered friends.

40 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Our Gamble in Space: The Military Danger (August 1963)
"The world will be a much safer place if we can succeed in maintaining space as a sanctuary for purely peaceful activities. But how do we keep the arms race from spreading to this new arena?" In 1963, Alton Frye argued that space was becoming a new Cold War battleground.

July 2003

15 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Matchimanito (July 1988)
"Our tribe unraveled like a coarse rope, frayed at either end as the old and new among us were taken. My own family was wiped out one by one." A short story by Louise Erdrich.

5 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Hymn
"By the time I understood that the absence of some dignities that I took for granted was one provocation for African-American lyrics... buses full of Freedom Riders were rolling south toward Anniston and Birmingham." In 1998, Emily Hiestand explored the color line in American religion—and in her own past.

110 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Problems of Presumptive Proof (July 1893)
"A law prohibiting convictions on criminal charges upon 'purely presumptive proof' would be a law to exempt the great majority of criminals of every class from punishment." In 1893, a contributor examined the complicated issue of criminal evidence and its relationship to deductive reasoning.

50 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Can the Liberals Rally? (July 1953)
"Liberals tend to underestimate the need for money and effective political organization. A million men will rarely spring to arms to carry even the most appealing ideology into effect through political action." In 1953, Joseph S. Clark Jr. outlined the challenges facing liberals in America.

June 2003

5 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Social Contradictions of Japanese Capitalism (June 1998)
"Every distinguishing feature of the Japanese economy comes from the national theory of unity through ties of blood, and from the strategies devised in the postwar years to exploit that theory for bare national survival." In 1998, Murray Sayle wrote that Japan's economic downturn was driven by a social crisis.

45 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Is France Being Americanized? (June 1958)
"America's help is not accepted without protest and more or less boastful attempts are made to reject it, but United States economic supremacy is a fact that we may have to live with for a long time." In 1958, the poet Pierre Emmanuel examined the growing influence of America on French society.

105 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
A Successful Bachelor (June 1898)
"More interest should be taken in bachelors. Their need is greater, and their condition really deplorable. It is a misfortune to be unhappily married, but it comes near to being a disgrace not to be married at all." In 1898, a contributor explored the role of the single man in a society of married couples.

15 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Runaway Revolution (June 1988)
"The strength of the intifada lay to a large degree in its lack of organization. Different places acted in different ways, at different paces, and with different levels of violence." In 1988, Ehud Ya'ari investigated the political causes and implications of the Palestinian radical uprising against the Israelis.

May 2003

20 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Voting for Unemployment (May 1983)
"In a way, unions have come full circle. Conceived and developed as a voice for the average worker, they now represent an elite of workers who are highly paid and elaborately protected. " In 1983, Gregg Easterbrook explored the history and evolution of the labor union.

10 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Midlife Myths (May 1993)
"When looking at the total U.S. population, the best year is fifty. Midlife is the 'it' you've been working toward. You can turn your attention toward being rather than becoming." In 1993, Winifred Gallagher examined research showing that "middle age may be the very best time of life."

60 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Wanted: American Radicals (May 1943)
"I recommend to the attention of all who are interested in preserving freedom the need for the American radical—the missing political link between the past and future of this great democratic land." During World War II, James B. Conant argued for progressive politics.

100 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Evolution of the Trained Nurse (May 1903)
"Nurses are either rapturously eulogized as noble women leading lives of complete self-sacrifice, or disliked as uppish minxes, giving more trouble than they are worth to the patient." One hundred years ago, a contributor looked back at the changing role of nurses.

April 2003

25 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Greene (April 1978)
"His magic was in his eyes, but coldly blazing they gave away only this warning of indestructible certainty. When he stared at me I felt as if it was no use confessing—he knew my secrets." A short story by Paul Theroux.

35 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
How Could Vietnam Happen?—An Autopsy (April 1968)
"Crucial throughout the process of Vietnam decision-making was a conviction among many policy-makers: that Vietnam posed a fundamental test of America's national will." In 1968 James C. Thomson Jr. dissected the forces that shaped U.S. policy in Vietnam.

March 2003

20 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Next American Frontier (March 1983)
"Ours is becoming an economy in which resources circulate endlessly among giant corporations, investment bankers, and their lawyers, but little new is produced." In 1983 Robert. B. Reich discussed the structural problems facing the American economy.

55 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Oscar Night in Hollywood (March 1948)
"If we can huckster a President into the White House, why cannot we huckster Miss Joan Crawford or Miss Olivia de Havilland into possession of one of those golden statuettes?" In 1948 Raymond Chandler bemoaned the spectacle of the Oscars, even as he defended film as an art form.

125 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Staff of the United States Army (March 1878)
"Our army presents the only known example of a business or profession in which incompetency and want of zeal bring the same substantial rewards as energy, capacity, and active attention to duty." In 1878 a U.S. Army colonel criticized the nation's military establishment.

February 2003

15 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Love Triangles (February 1988)
"Romantic love has been described as a religion of two, but love pairs can be infected by triangles and may even be wholly contaminated by them. Or, more positively, triangles may sometimes help love along." In 1988 a psychiatrist analyzed what happens when two becomes three.

40 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Cuba and the Nuclear Risk (February 1963)
"To Europeans I say, trust us not to desert you or to betray you. Believe me when I tell you that the contemporary American superiority in nuclear weapons is a burden and not something that Americans are happy about." In 1963 Walter Lippman tried to calm Europe's fears about U.S. hegemony.

30 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Making of Gone With the Wind (February 1973)
"Gable at first refused the part. Always lacking confidence, he was frankly terrified at the prospect of Rhett Butler." In 1973 Gavin Lambert described the rocky genesis of one of the most successful movies of all time.

10 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Islam and Liberal Democracy (February 1993)
"For Islamic fundamentalists, democracy is obviously an irrelevance. They are, however, willing to demand and exploit the opportunities that a self-proclaimed democratic system by its own logic is bound to offer them." In 1993 Bernard Lewis studied the troubled marriage of Islam and democracy.

January 2003

30 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Yellow Trolley Car in Barcelona, and Other Visions (January 1973)
"We had been drinking Scotch carefully for about five hours, lost in small talk and the free-form interchange of two languages." In 1973 the novelist William Kennedy visited Gabriel García Márquez in Spain and wrote a profile for The Atlantic.

95 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Justice to the Corporations (January 1908)
"Let us begin anew, knowing that the corporations are to-day obeying the laws, and knowing also that the standards of honesty, honor, and fair dealing are higher than in the last century." In 1908 a contributor assured readers that in the future corporations could be trusted.

70 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Royal Road to Bankruptcy (January 1933)
"That was the New Era. The old laws of economics were for mortals, but not for us. Looking back now, I see how naive were our godlike airs." Four years after the stock market crash, a former executive recounted his fall.

115 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The History of Children's Books (January 1888)
"There have been children's stories and folk-tales ever since man first learned to speak. Children's books, however, are a late growth of literature." In 1888 an Atlantic contributor surveyed the development of books for children.

December 2002

10 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The New Generation Gap (December 1992)
"Already Thirteeners blame Boomers for much that has gone wrong in their world, a tendency that is sure to grow once Boomers move fully into positions of political leadership." In 1992 Neil Howe and William Strauss predicted conflict between Baby Boomers and Generation X.

85 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Threatened Eclipse of Free Speech (December 1917)
"When we start out to kill enemies abroad on a gigantic scale, we are not likely to hesitate to gag those at home who seem directly or indirectly to sympathize with the foe." In 1917 an Atlantic contributor warned of the dangers of abridging free speech during wartime.

100 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Ideals of America (December 1902)
"What are our thoughts now, as we look back from this altered age to the Revolution which to-day we celebrate?" On the 125th anniversary of the Battle of Trenton, Woodrow Wilson pondered America's past and future.

20 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Price of Power (December 1982)
"With Chile, as with Watergate, the White House was in league with unscrupulous and violent men who did not understand the difference between right and wrong." In 1982 The Atlantic published Seymour Hersh's report on Kissinger, Nixon, and their secret activities in Chile.

November 2002

5 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Half-Skinned Steer (November 1997)
"They called it a ranch and it had been, but one day the old man said cows couldn't be run in such tough country." A short story by E. Annie Proulx, selected by John Updike as one of the best short stories of the twentieth century.

145 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Brahma (November 1857)
"I am the doubter and the doubt/ And I the hymn the Brahmin sings." Ralph Waldo Emerson's Eastern-influenced poem about the Hindu god Brahma appeared in The Atlantic Monthly's first issue.

80 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
What Are College Games For? (November 1922)
"Surely we are not in the business of making profits from the games of our students. But in some way or other we have gotten into that business." In 1922 the president of Amherst College considered the role of college sports.

30 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Pentagon Papers Trial (November 1972)
"On the eve of the trial, with the jury finally chosen and already sworn, there came a bizarre interruption." In 1972 Sanford J. Ungar covered the unorthodox trial of Daniel Ellsberg and Anthony Russo.

55 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Atomic War or Peace (November 1947)
"The public, having been warned of the horrible nature of atomic warfare, has done nothing about it." In 1947 Albert Einstein urged the United States to work actively to avert the threat of a nuclear war.

October 2002

60 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Will the Christian Church Survive? (October 1942)
"That the Church has had small influence of late, and seems likely to have little more in the immediate future, is the Church's own fault." In 1942 Bernard Iddings Bell warned that Christianity was withering away.

55 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Peace Is Still Possible (October 1947)
"The UN must be given the constitutional authority to maintain the peace through laws which no national government may override." In 1947 Cord Meyer Jr. argued in favor of strengthening the UN.

140 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Autumnal Tints (October 1862)
"Nature herself holds her annual fair in October, not only in the streets, but in every hollow and on every hill-side." In 1862 Thoreau waxed poetic about the brilliance of fall in New England.

5 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Can the Government Prevent Divorce? (October 1997)
"Government-funded researchers have declared that they can predict with about 90 percent accuracy which engaged couples will divorce." In 1997 Francine Russo reported on a new government effort to nip bad marriages in the bud.

September 2002

60 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Coming Air Age (September 1942)
"Let us peer briefly at 1955 and see how your wife handles a typical family helicopter as she flies fifty miles to spend an hour with a friend." In 1942 an aero-engineer predicted that helicopters would soon replace cars.

35 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Flowering of the Hippies (September 1967)
"It was easy to see that the young men who were hippies on Haight Street wore beards and long hair and sometimes earrings and weird-o granny eye-glasses, and that they were generally dirty."

5 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
A Grief Like No Other (September 1997)
"A murder is an unnatural death; no ordinary rules apply. The intense grief experienced by survivors can last five years, a decade, even a lifetime." In 1997, Eric Schlosser wrote about the trauma caused by the murder of loved ones.

25 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Genesis vs. Geology (September 1982)
"Dogmatic assent to disproved claims is not scientific behavior." In September 1982 Stephen Jay Gould took on the creationists.

August 2002

25 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Getting Whitey (August 1977)
"The white is being paid back for years of portraying blacks in movies as simple, shiftless, and stupid, although occasionally faithful and brave as well." In 1977, David Denby commented on the rise of the "blaxploitation" movie.

80 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Jazz: A Musical Discussion (August 1922)
"Where did you hear, before jazz was invented, such multifarious stirring, heaving, wrestling of independent voices as there are in a jazz orchestra?" In 1922 Carl Engel defended jazz against claims that it was "lewd" and "grotesque."

30 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Green Days and Photojournalism, and the Old Man in the Room (August 1972)
"I went to work for Life in the summer of 1952. I was twenty-one years old, just out of college ... and felt that it was about time I had a job." In 1972 Michael J. Arlen reminisced about his experiences as an apprentice reporter at Life Magazine.

July 2002

15 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Oh, Well (July 1987)
"Several thousand time capsules are ceremoniously squirreled away and forgotten for every one that successfully conveys its cargo into the hands of a future generation." In 1987 Albert Bergesen considered the surprisingly common phenomenon of forgetting about time capsules.

80 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Mahatma Gandhi (July 1922)
"When I met Mr. Gandhi, I suggested that it was idle to stir up violence in the heart and to forbid violence by the hand. But he regarded me pityingly." In 1922 the novelist and war correspondent Edmund Candler assessed Gandhi's role as a leader in India.

20 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Living With a Computer (July 1982)
"The process works this way. When I sit down to write a letter or start the first draft of an article, I simply type on the keyboard and the words appear on the screen." In 1982 James Fallows introduced Atlantic readers to the concept of the personal computer.

100 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
On Keeping the Fourth of July (July 1902)
"The world's cross-roads will have to be policed for a long time yet, until men learn to hate one another less, and our own country's share in the world's police service should be efficient and ample." At the close of Philippine-American War, The Atlantic pondered democracy, imperialism, and the significance of Independence Day.

June 2002

25 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Life on Mars (June 1977)
"We may be close to the momentous occasion when NASA officials call a press conference to release the mindboggling news that Earth people are not alone." In 1977 David L. Chandler assessed the evidence for Martian life.

15 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Behind the Terror (June 1987)
"It is a party whose leaders, men approaching their seventies, send pregnant teenagers on suicide missions in booby-trapped cars." Ehud Ya'ari on the Syrian Social Nationalist Party, an organization that was behind some of the most deadly terrorist attacks of the '80s.

20 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Waiting for the End (June 1982)
"Millions of American evangelicals apparently believe that within the present generation, and probably sometime in the 1980s, Jesus will return to lay the groundwork for a glorious thousand-year reign here on earth." An examination of an upswing in apocalyptic prophesy.

10 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Taking the Offensive (June 1992)
"Reorienting our policy regarding terrorism would be costly, in terms of both dollars and politics, but the potential rewards are considerable." In 1992 Mark Edington argued that the United States should take proactive, aggressive action against terrorism.

May 2002

15 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Great Moments in Literary Baseball (May 1987)
"In 1965 Twins player-manager Vladimir Nabokov obtained league permission to play a game in reverse, beginning with the ninth inning." What if Kafka, Henry James, Hemingway, Thomas Wolfe, and Sartre had played baseball? By Robert Atwan

30 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
A Season at Middle-America U. (May 1972)
"They think about work, but they also think about alternative styles, communes, revolution, pot-making, food stamps, techniques, survival." In 1972 Herbert Gold shared his impressions of life at a small Appalachian college where he spent a semester as a guest lecturer.

10 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Deep Throat: An Institutional Analysis (May 1992)
"I called Woodward and asked what was new. 'I just talked to my friend at the FBI,' Woodward answered. 'I think we're on to a whole new level on this thing.'" In 1992 James Mann, a co-worker of Bob Woodward's at The Post, took an informed guess at the identity of Deep Throat.

40 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Atlantic Report: Washington (May 1962)
"There is talk now of a lunar landing in 1967, or even, according to the optimists, in 1966.... Whatever doubts there were before Colonel John Glenn's orbital flight seem to have vanished since." In 1962, The Atlantic took stock of the American space program.

April 2002

125 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Dickens's American Notes (April 1877)
"It is cruel to make one man shake hands with a nation of men. The ovations were pleasant enough at first, but when the charm of novelty wore off they became an insufferable bore." A reviewer chides Charles Dickens for his sour account of his visit to the U.S. in 1842.

25 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Anatomy of Bliss (April 1977)
"The writing is small, in a cursive hand, made by a blue ball-point pen, fine-tipped. The words are of varying length, but they spell nothing." A short story about a man trying to understand his wife's odd behavior.

40 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Jukebox Piracy (April 1962)
"No matter how often a song is played, its composer and lyricist receive no royalty." In 1962 an Atlantic contributor argued in favor of amending jukebox copyright laws.

March 2002

135 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Mr. Hardhack on the Derivation of Man from the Monkey (March 1867)
"I, for one, am not to be reasoned out of my humanity, and I won't be diddled into turning baboon through deference for anybody's logic." E. P. Whipple parodies the arguments of a man refusing to accept Darwin's theory of evolution.

60 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Those Who Make Poems (March 1942)
"If you are going to be a poet, you don't care a hoot what I say or what anybody but yourself says. If you're afraid you're wasting your time, you probably are." In 1942 Carl Sandburg offered his thoughts to would-be poets.

25 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Johore Murders (March 1977)
"If the second victim had not been an American, I probably would not have given the Johore murders a second thought, and I certainly would not have been involved in the business." A short story by Paul Theroux

85 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Viola's Lovers (March 1917)
"I felt somewhat like a dry-as-dust professor married to a young and attractive wife who is being taken to all the parties throughout the neighborhood by a disgustingly youthful and handsome cavalier." A man and his neighbor compete for the affections of his dog.

February 2002

90 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Long Run (February 1912)
"There was something fundamental the matter with Merrick: something dreadful, unforeseen, unaccountable." A short story about a man's decision not to pursue an affair. By Edith Wharton.

80 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Buying of Books (February 1922)
"Sometimes, when I have bought a book that I did not need and am a little ashamed to go home, I make an inscription in it: 'To my dear wife, upon her birthday; many happy returns.'" A minister confesses to his insatiable appetite for new books.

105 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Olympic Games, Old and New (February 1897)
"The Olympic games stared at me from every shop window, every wall. The newspapers had no other news." In 1897 a Greek scholar reported on his visit to Greece during the first Olympic games since ancient times.

20 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Singing-Impaired (February 1982)
"No national foundation exists for the singing-impaired. Nor does any branch of medical science offer hope. No one provides little ramps to get the singing-impaired up onto certain notes." By Roy Blount Jr.

January 2002

100 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Recent Progress in Astronomy (January 1902)
"[The fact] that luminiferous ether fills the visible heavens seems established beyond doubt by the appearances of the stellar universe."

15 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Long Distance (January 1987)
"In the five months that Kirby knew Mieko in Japan, and in the calls between them since, she has never shed a tear, but now she weeps with absolute abandon, in long, heaving sobs." A short story by the Pulitzer Prize winning author Jane Smiley.

25 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Biggest Pimp of All (January 1977)
"It is time to take note that there are ways to provide sex for money that are acceptable to prostitutes, law enforcement officials, and the surrounding communities." In 1977 Elizabeth and James Vorenberg considered the benefits of legalizing prostitution.

40 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Are Cities Dead? (January 1962)
"There are plenty of things that are wrong with our cities. But why exaggerate? Why ignore the remarkable people and achievements which make our big cities the powerful magnets they are?" By Robert Moses.

December 2001

15 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Who Do Men Say That I Am? (December 1986)
"Was [Jesus], as traditional Christian dogmatics hold, both God and Man—"the Word made flesh?... Was he simply another of those charismatics who appear from time to time?" In 1986 Cullen Murphy reported on the state of theological research into the identity of Jesus.

115 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Intellectual Mission of the Saracens (December 1886)
"The Saracens gathered from all sources the ancient treasures of knowledge, and, absorbing them into the body of Arabian science, distributed them with a lavish hand." In 1886 Edward Hungerford argued that Islamic culture saved the wisdom of the ancients from extinction during the Middle Ages.

25 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Notes on Being Hijacked (December 1976)
"It is past midnight. We are over ocean. It begins to settle in. I have been hijacked." On September 10, 1976, five Croatian terrorists hijacked TWA Flight 355. One of the passengers, Richard Brockman, wrote an account of the ordeal.

November 2001

95 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Ideal Lawyer (November 1906)
"Who is the ideal lawyer, what are his characteristics, what his essential elements and qualifications?" In 1906 David J. Brewer, who had been a judge for more than forty years, attempted to answer those questions.

35 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
My Father (November 1966)
"I've heard some of the great parliamentary debates of our time, but I don't think I have ever heard better discussions of basic issues than I did as a boy standing behind my father's soda fountain." In 1966 Vice President Hubert Humphrey paid tribute to his father.

30 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Disarmed at Middle Age (November 1971)
"I promised myself that when I grew older—even forty—I would still wear jeans and giggle and never wear my hair in sausage curls or put on aqua rhinestone harlequin glasses. And I never have, but I don't rule the world." A consideration of growing older by Antonia Chayes.

140 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Flower of Liberty (November 1861)
"The blades of heroes fence it round; Where'er it springs is holy ground ... Then hail the banner of the free, The starry Flower of Liberty!" A patriotic poem by Oliver Wendell Holmes.

October 2001

15 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Where Toys Come From (October 1986)
"Ken is still a goody-goody and Barbie's feet are still shaped for high-heeled shoes, but a lot of other things about the dolls have changed." In 1986 David Owen considered the art of selling fun to children.

90 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
One View of Domestic Science (October 1911)
"The idea that every woman needs practical instruction in housekeeping as a part of her education is as absurd as would be the claim that every man needs to be taught in school to plant corn or milk a cow." In 1911, Mary Leal Harkness contested the idea that girls ought to study home economics.

120 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
River Driftwood (October 1881)
"In the summer, when the days are hot and long, there is nothing better than the glory of the moonlighted nights, when the shrill cries of the insects fill all the air, and the fireflies are everywhere, and a whiff of saltness comes up with the tide." In 1882, Sarah Orne Jewett recorded her musings on the river near her home in Berwick, Maine.

80 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Is There Anything in Prayer? (October 1921)
"There is a technique of prayer which can be mastered." In 1921 J. Edgar Park attempted to explain how prayer works.

September 2001

140 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Great Expectations, by Charles Dickens (September 1861)
"In no other of his romances has the author succeeded so perfectly in at once stimulating and baffling the curiosity of his readers."

85 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Has the War Affected the Weather? (September 1916)
"For some months past the weather conditions have been abnormal, particularly in the matter of rainfall, in the battle-zones and elsewhere." In the midst of World War I, a meteorologist considered whether explosions at the front lines were causing extra precipitation.

140 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Advantages of Defeat (September 1861)
"Our defeat at Bull Run was in no true sense a disaster; we not only deserved it, but needed it. It should give us new confidence in our cause, in our strength, in our final success." Soon after the start of the Civil War, Charles Eliot Norton urged the Union Army to toughen its resolve.

105 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Awakening of the Negro (September 1896)
"Let us go on for a few more years knitting our business and industrial relations into those of the white man, till a black man gets a mortgage on a white man's house that he can foreclose at will." In 1896 Booker T. Washington published a controversial article advocating vocational education for freed slaves.

August 2001

130 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Werewolves and Swan-maidens (August 1871)
"We need no longer regard our werewolf as an inexplicable creature of undetermined pedigree." In 1871 an Atlantic contributor described the origins of certain medieval superstitions—some fanciful, some gruesome.

45 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Smell of Lilies (August 1956)
"In a terrible, sinister way, he felt that his wife grew younger on her chaise longue, year after year. Whereas he grew much older, faster than time, crouched there in his neat white cell high above Fifth Avenue." A short story by the war correspondent Martha Gellhorn.

100 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Nude in Museums (August 1901)
"If the public demands that the Discobolus should be relegated to an attic because it is unclothed, very well, let it go there. Let me have the key to the attic when I wish it." In 1901 an Atlantic contributor joined a debate over whether nude statues should be banned from public spaces.

35 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
White-Collar Pill Party (August 1966)
"Next to the candy dish filled with Dexedrine, Dexamyl, Eskatrol, Desbutal, and a few other products I hadn't yet learned to identify, near the five-pound box of Dexedrine tablets someone had brought, were two bottles." In 1966 Bruce Jackson reported on the party scene of urban professional pill-poppers.

July 2001

20 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Pygmalion (July 1981)
"What he disliked about his first wife was the way she would ask to have her back rubbed and then, under his laboring hands, night after night, fall asleep." A short story by John Updike.

65 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
A More Modest Proposal (July 1936)
"In brief, let us freeze up those few millions of the unemployed who yet remain." During the Great Depression an Atlantic contributor suggested a rather unorthodox use for the new technology of cryogenic freezing.

20 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Flying Upside Down (July 1981)
"They were building their own 32-bit supermini ... maybe the basis for Data General's ascent in the Fortune 500." Tracy Kidder's chronicle of the race to build a smaller, faster computer. He later expanded the article into a Pulitzer Prize-winning book, The Soul of a New Machine.

75 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Russian Effort to Abolish Marriage (July 1926)
"Men took to changing wives with the same zest which they displayed in the consumption of the recently restored forty-per-cent vodka." A decade after the Bolsheviks' rise to power, a woman then living in Russia described the chaos that resulted when they tried to abolish marriage.

June 2001

60 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Cloud, Castle, Lake (June 1941)
"Vasili Ivanovich contrived to enjoy the fleeting gifts of the road. And indeed, how enticing it all is, what charm the world acquires when it is wound up and moving like a merry-go-round!" A short story by Vladimir Nabokov—the first piece of his writing to appear in an English-language magazine.

40 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Captivity of Marriage
(June 1961)

"In spite of her hopes for fulfillment, [the young mother] vaguely feels that she is frittering away her days and that a half-defined but important part of her ability is lying about unused." Nora Johnson on the frustrations of life as a 1960s housewife.

75 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Journalism and Morality
(June 1926)

"Not defensively, but that the record may be straight, let me say that I did very little faking, although there was no special prejudice against it, so long as the fake wasn't libelous." A reporter looks back at his days as a yellow journalist.

140 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Pickens-and-Stealin's Rebellion (June 1861)
"Had any one ventured to prophesy on the Fourth of March that the immediate prospect of Civil War would be hailed by the people of the Free States with a unanimous shout of enthusiasm, he would have been thought a madman." An editorial by James Russell Lowell, The Atlantic's first editor.


Copyright © 2001 by The Atlantic Monthly Group. All rights reserved.