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Worn in both senses

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Topic: 10) Worn in both senses (1 of 6), Read 122 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Barbara Wallraff (msgrammar@theatlantic.com)
Date: Wednesday, November 10, 1999 08:51 AM

Micki Jewett, of Austin, Texas, writes, "What would mean the sort of 'badly dressed' that's just what you wear at home when no one's looking?"

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Topic: 10) Worn in both senses (2 of 6), Read 117 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Roger Gay (roger.f.gay@telia.se)
Date: Wednesday, November 10, 1999 09:56 AM

The original meaning of leisure wear.

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Topic: 10) Worn in both senses (3 of 6), Read 104 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Aaron Reneker (zanazarius@yahoo.com)
Date: Friday, November 12, 1999 04:31 PM

I've heard the term "comfort clothes" used the same way some people describe chocolate (myself included) as "comfort food." Also, "grungies," "lounge-abouters," "toss-offs," and "things-you-wouldn't-let-your-mother-see-you-in-but-you-don't-give-a-damn-about-the-dog- wear."

Aaron

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Topic: 10) Worn in both senses (4 of 6), Read 89 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Pete Horne (paypete1st@aol.com)
Date: Wednesday, November 17, 1999 02:23 PM

We used to call them "grub" [from grubby}. That was a long time ago. Nowadays it would probably be considered "fashionable" by a substantial portion of the younger generation.

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Topic: 10) Worn in both senses (5 of 6), Read 52 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Mark Spivey (mark.spivey@ac.com)
Date: Friday, November 26, 1999 08:38 AM

In my youth here in the UK my teacher used the phrase "glad rags".

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Topic: 10) Worn in both senses (6 of 6), Read 34 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Leslie Fournier (lfournier@node.on.ca)
Date: Friday, December 03, 1999 04:50 PM

My mother always called this kind of clothing her "sloughies" (I'm guessing at the spelling since she never wrote it down. Perhaps "sluffies"?) I have no idea where that came from, but she also used to say "sloughing around" when everyone else said "lounging around". Hmm...


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