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Shock of the old

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Topic: 1) Shock of the old (1 of 9), Read 83 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Barbara Wallraff (msgrammar@theatlantic.com)
Date: Wednesday, January 06, 1999 02:08 PM

Kevin Murray, of Melbourne, Australia, writes: "I am looking for a word that might describe the feeling of waking up on January 1, 2000, when the world won't have radically changed. 'Shock of the old' is a useful inversion of 'Shock of the new,' but I'd like to find something a little more clinical, perhaps in German. This feeling is a variety of the 'uncanny' when something that was assumed to be past persists in the present. This is different from 'memento mori,' such as finding that your hair has gone grey. It's more the distance between hype about the millennium and the reality of sameness."

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Topic: 1) Shock of the old (2 of 9), Read 69 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Judy Singer (jsinger@acs.itd.uts.edu.au)
Date: Friday, January 08, 1999 05:22 PM

Resignation? i got the feeling that you weren't looking for a word, but a physical manoevre involving lowering the eyelids disdainfully, sagging the shoulders, rolling over and going back to sleep.

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Topic: 1) Shock of the old (3 of 9), Read 66 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Michael Fischer (tsuwm@aol.com)
Date: Friday, January 08, 1999 06:16 PM

Well, fortuitously, the Germans do have a word that pretty much describes this "feeling" and that word is weltschmerz. My BIG dictionary defines this as:
1) apathy caused by comparing the actual state of the world with an ideal state
2) a mood of sentimental sadness
The literal meaning is something like "world pain".
This is not to be confused with weltanschauung, which would be more like having a predisposed world view.

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Topic: 1) Shock of the old (4 of 9), Read 61 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Dan Chall (danchall@interport.net)
Date: Friday, January 08, 1999 07:53 PM

I suppose "anticlimax" wouldn't live up to the expectations raised by the question.

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Topic: 1) Shock of the old (5 of 9), Read 57 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Gregory Alan Bolcer (gbolcer@endeavors.org)
Date: Sunday, January 10, 1999 03:25 PM

I propose adding to the genre of the Vu's:
presque vu, jamais vu, deja vu. All of these
have to do with the sudden shock of realization,
although in different forms.

I am thinking of something between the cross
of antique, archaic, and antidiluvian.

antiqua vu

Greg

On 1/6/99 2:08:48 PM, Barbara Wallraff wrote:
>Kevin Murray, of Melbourne,
>Australia, writes: "I am
>looking for a word that might
>describe the feeling of waking
>up on January 1, 2000, when
>the world won't have radically
>changed. 'Shock of the old' is
>a useful inversion of 'Shock
>of the new,' but I'd like to
>find something a little more
>clinical, perhaps in German.
>This feeling is a variety of
>the 'uncanny' when something
>that was assumed to be past
>persists in the present. This
>is different from 'memento
>mori,' such as finding that
>your hair has gone grey. It's
>more the distance between hype
>about the millennium and the
>reality of sameness."
>
>




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Topic: 1) Shock of the old (6 of 9), Read 58 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Michael Fischer (tsuwm@aol.com)
Date: Monday, January 11, 1999 02:17 PM

"I propose adding to the genre of the Vu's:
presque vu, jamais vu, deja vu. All of these
have to do with the sudden shock of realization, although in different forms."

As an admirer of "the genre of the Vu's", I heartily approve of this notion; how about siecle vu (literally, century seen)?

"...something between the cross of..."

(Barbara, is there a word for this particular type of pleonasm? ;-)

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Topic: 1) Shock of the old (7 of 9), Read 61 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Barbara Wallraff (msgrammar@theatlantic.com)
Date: Monday, January 11, 1999 04:47 PM

It's so easy to type two versions of something and to forget to delete one or the other before posting that I think the word you're looking for, Michael, is "typo." Or do we need yet another new word? E-typo? Eonasm?

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Topic: 1) Shock of the old (8 of 9), Read 47 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Kevin Murray (kmurray@mira.net)
Date: Thursday, January 14, 1999 05:05 PM

Perhaps "shock of the old" is more a French than German kind of experience. I guess Germans are likely to get more sentimental about returning to what is familiar, in a "Heimat" kind of sense. Whereas "siecle vu" seems to express better the almost mystical nature of "shock of the old". Like Baudelaire says: "all modernism is worthy of becoming antiquity some day". What's missing from this nostalgia is a resigned realism about millennial disappointment. Which makes me wonder whether there is a particularly American strain as well, perhaps in writers like Richard Ford.

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Topic: 1) Shock of the old (9 of 9), Read 46 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Gregory Alan Bolcer (gbolcer@endeavors.org)
Date: Thursday, January 14, 1999 06:57 PM

I like it. Do we have a consensus?

On 1/14/99 5:05:32 PM, Kevin Murray wrote:
>Perhaps "shock of the old" is
>more a French than German kind
>of experience. I guess Germans
>are likely to get more
>sentimental about returning to
>what is familiar, in a
>"Heimat" kind of sense.
>Whereas "siecle vu" seems to
>express better the almost
>mystical nature of "shock of
>the old". Like Baudelaire
>says: "all modernism is worthy
>of becoming antiquity some
>day". What's missing from this
>nostalgia is a resigned
>realism about millennial
>disappointment. Which makes me
>wonder whether there is a
>particularly American strain
>as well, perhaps in writers
>like Richard Ford.
>




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