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Topic: 2) Saved! (1 of 3), Read 80 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Barbara Wallraff (msgrammar@theatlantic.com)
Date: Thursday, September 09, 1999 09:37 AM

Piya Kochhar, of New York, New York, writes: "I wonder if there is a word for something that is new but not really new. For example, if I have a shirt that I've had in my closet for a year but have never worn, would that be a new shirt or an old shirt? It seems to me that there should be a word to describe this, but I can't seem to find it."

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Topic: 2) Saved! (2 of 3), Read 76 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Aaron Reneker (zanazarius@yahoo.com)
Date: Thursday, September 09, 1999 04:52 PM

I believe the "fashionable" (excuse the pun) term might be "recently purchased," to describe clothing that has not been worn yet. I think the accepted time for clothing to still be considered "recently purchased" is about 18 months. Obviously, if the garment is no longer in fashion, then it doesn't matter if the article was "recently purchased" or not. For things like designer jeans and other annual favorites, I believe that "recently purchased" may be used for up to two years. Needless to say, undergarments and other personal items do not fall into any such categorization (besides which, nobody should really care except for the wearer).

Aaron

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Topic: 2) Saved! (3 of 3), Read 59 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Van Happy (stillcrazyasever@hotmail.com)
Date: Friday, September 10, 1999 04:01 PM

Piya,

How about "untouched"?
Would work for books and all sorts of things.

V.H.

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Topic: saved (1 of 4), Read 47 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Piya Kochhar (pikochhar@hotmail.com)
Date: Friday, September 10, 1999 03:52 PM

Hi Aaron,

I never knew that clothing was considered 'new' for two years (which by the way is the suggested expiration date for bottled water!). But taking the idea a bit further---what if I have a shirt or bag or pair of shoes or even a book, which I've never worn or opened, for twenty years. Would that be old or new? I'm looking for a term that would describe such a situation. Maybe "Nold"?

Thanks,
Piya

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Topic: saved (2 of 4), Read 40 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Aaron Reneker (zanazarius@yahoo.com)
Date: Friday, September 10, 1999 04:43 PM

Hello, Piya!

Actually, my, er, fashion sense was taken from my sister, who is a cosmetologist. The "two-year" rule usually only applies to items that won't go out of fashion any time soon, such as a pair of jeans or a T-shirt. My sister said that this gives women who are pregnant a chance to wear items of clothing that they may have bought before the blessed event occurred. With men, I don't think time really matters (when does it ever, really?). I have a pair of Bermudas that I have had for twelve years that I will never wear simply because they are hideous (they are yellow and green with jet black diagonal stripes). However, my very good friend gave me those shorts, so I occasionally will throw them into the laundry basket in plain sight, so that when she comes by to visit, she will see that I still have them.
Now, if an item is ever washed before it is worn, according to my sister, it can no longer be officially considered new, even if the article is never worn. Thankfully, Heather (my friend) doesn't look at things too closely, or else she would have noticed that the colors on said Bermudas are still awfully bright (pun intended)! Thankfully, part 2, she also doesn't hook onto this web site, so my secret is still safe....:)

I like "nold" for a word to describe books and such, but can you imagine the horror on Madison Avenue if a new fashion was described as "nold?" Rhymes to much with "mold," and you know how the papers would run with that one!

A "nold" book, though....sounds cool!

Aaron

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Topic: saved (3 of 4), Read 42 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Catherine Griffiths (cegriffs@erols.com)
Date: Friday, September 10, 1999 07:33 PM

Aaron,
those bermudas are classics;
like Gershwin or Holiday or
even Satchhmo...fashion is just
music to me.

catherine

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Topic: saved (4 of 4), Read 29 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Aaron Reneker (zanazarius@yahoo.com)
Date: Sunday, September 12, 1999 04:17 PM

Catherine,

Trust me, these Bermudas are more akin to a cat being run through a dishwasher than a symphony. Classics they may be, but in the closet is where they will stay. :)

Aaron


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