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Joint decision

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Topic: 5) Joint decision (1 of 5), Read 71 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Barbara Wallraff (msgrammar@theatlantic.com)
Date: Wednesday, June 16, 1999 09:13 AM

Steve Roberts, of Venice, Calif., writes: "In the classic film comedy Sir Henry at Rawlinson End (England, 1985ish), Sir Henry, a man given to unusual utterances like 'Afterlife, aftershave, I don't believe in any of it' and 'I don't know what I want but I want it NOW,' asked of Hubert -- his unusual brother who thought that swans were the snorkels of dinosaur leviathans gliding cold-eyed beneath the lake -- 'Do you know that there is no name for the back of the knee?'

"Time to change that?"

The same lack exists for the interior of the elbow, I believe.



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Topic: 5) Joint decision (2 of 5), Read 56 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Michael Vendrell (mvendrel@hotmail.com)
Date: Thursday, June 17, 1999 05:09 PM

In medical anatomy (albeit in Latin) the back of the knee is known as the popliteal fossa. And, by the way, the antecubital fossa is the front of the elbow.

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Topic: 5) Joint decision (3 of 5), Read 54 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: John Posten (repsap@yahoo.com)
Date: Friday, June 18, 1999 09:00 AM

How 'bout that! and 'fossa' means ditch in latin. Did' ya see all them retreads gathering dust in that fossa by the road?

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Topic: 5) Joint decision (4 of 5), Read 15 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Gillian Wogin (wogin.gillian@ic.gc.ca)
Date: Wednesday, June 30, 1999 01:42 PM

The inside of the elbow is the crook of the arm (so maybe the back of the knee is the crook of the leg?)

Gill Wogin
Ottawa

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Topic: 5) Joint decision (5 of 5), Read 3 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Aaron Reneker (zanazarius@yahoo.com)
Date: Wednesday, June 30, 1999 10:18 PM

I have also heard the backs of the arm and elbow described as crooks. Although my ex-girlfriend also used to call them errogenous zones....

:)

Aaron Reneker

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Topic: Back of the knee (1 of 1), Read 31 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Tom Ryan (tryan@gardano.ne.mediaone.net)
Date: Monday, June 21, 1999 11:42 AM

When I was younger, the phrase I'd call out when tickling the back of my younger brothers and sisters' knees was "Gerrrry Cheevers!!" (The Boston Bruins goalie way back in Bobby Orr days).

Sometimes a completely nonsensical connection between the object and its name just 'feels right'...


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