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To yesterday, to day, and to morrow

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Topic: 8) To yesterday, to day, and to morrow (1 of 10), Read 137 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Barbara Wallraff (msgrammar@theatlantic.com)
Date: Wednesday, February 10, 1999 03:01 PM

Ottar Draugsvold, of Ashburnham, Massachusetts, writes: "Don't we need an intransitive verb that expresses a state that has been, is, and will be? I have in mind a word less encompassing than 'eternal' -- a verb to use in the following construction: 'He has lied in the past, he is lying now, and will lie in the future.' One word to describe the continuum. Any suggestions?"

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Topic: 8) To yesterday, to day, and to morrow (2 of 10), Read 122 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Mary Jo McDermott (mcdermott_maryjo@allergan.com)
Date: Wednesday, February 10, 1999 04:52 PM

How about this - He's a freakin'liar!

Just kidding

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Topic: 8) To yesterday, to day, and to morrow (3 of 10), Read 116 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Glenn Werner (brshfire@frontiernet.net)
Date: Wednesday, February 10, 1999 10:51 PM

How about, Subscriptive?
"He lies subscriptively." or "He is a subscriptive liar"
Meaning he has a collection of past lies, the current lie, and will predictively continue to fabricate them on a regular basis.

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Topic: 8) To yesterday, to day, and to morrow (4 of 10), Read 120 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Glenn Werner (brshfire@frontiernet.net)
Date: Thursday, February 11, 1999 11:12 AM

Here we are from # 1
Now let me show you what I've done!

He is a perpetual liar isn't he?
Because he lies perpetually!

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Topic: 8) To yesterday, to day, and to morrow (5 of 10), Read 107 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Tracy Durden (tdandaa@yahoo.com)
Date: Saturday, February 13, 1999 01:40 AM

My dad likes to call such people "ubiquitous prevaricators."
;-)
td

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Topic: 8) To yesterday, to day, and to morrow (6 of 10), Read 86 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Michael Fischer (tsuwm@aol.com)
Date: Tuesday, February 16, 1999 05:07 PM

On 2/10/99 3:01:25 PM, Barbara Wallraff wrote:
>Ottar Draugsvold, of
>Ashburnham, Massachusetts,
>writes: "Don't we need an
>intransitive verb that
>expresses a state that has
>been, is, and will be? I have
>in mind a word less
>encompassing than 'eternal' --
>a verb to use in the following
>construction: 'He has lied in
>the past, he is lying now, and
>will lie in the future.' One
>word to describe the
>continuum. Any suggestions?"

Are you looking for something to replace the verb 'lie' in the continuum or an adjective to use instead of 'eternal'? I believe someone suggested 'perpetual', but here's another adjective with a more pejorative shading: incessant.




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Topic: 8) To yesterday, to day, and to morrow (7 of 10), Read 71 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: David Tarvin (dtarvin@bkg.state.ne.us)
Date: Thursday, February 18, 1999 10:13 AM

I think the proper word is "Clinton."

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Topic: 8) To yesterday, to day, and to morrow (8 of 10), Read 40 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Tim Dunlop (tinota@ozemail.com.au)
Date: Sunday, February 21, 1999 09:06 PM

How about 'everywhen' on the model, obviously, of 'everywhere'? This would also lead to the word 'nowhen'. I got this from the English philosopher, Roger Scruton, who uses it in attempting to understand the nature of god, being in all places (everywhere) at all times (everywhen). Just as we say, 'here, there and everywhere', we could now say, 'now, then and everywhen'.

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Topic: 8) To yesterday, to day, and to morrow (9 of 10), Read 36 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Michael Christian (mschrist@umich.edu)
Date: Monday, February 22, 1999 10:07 PM

In econometrics, the term "stationarity" is used to describe a sequence whose underlying process does not change over time. For example, if income was a stationary process, the way in which income in 1995 depended on income in 1992 would be the same as the way in which income in 1902 depended on income in 1899.

You could probably accurately and effectively describe the gentleman in question to an economist by saying "he lies with stationarity."

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Topic: 8) To yesterday, to day, and to morrow (10 of 10), Read 16 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Aaron Gross (adg@pobox.com)
Date: Thursday, February 25, 1999 06:56 PM

On 2/10/99 3:01:25 PM, Barbara Wallraff wrote:
>Ottar Draugsvold, of
>Ashburnham, Massachusetts,
>writes: "Don't we need an
>intransitive verb that
>expresses a state that has
>been, is, and will be? I have
>in mind a word less
>encompassing than 'eternal' --
>a verb to use in the following
>construction: 'He has lied in
>the past, he is lying now, and
>will lie in the future.' One
>word to describe the
>continuum. Any suggestions?"

omnichronological?




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