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A disagreement among friends

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Topic: 10) A disagreement among friends (1 of 5), Read 64 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Barbara Wallraff (msgrammar@theatlantic.com)
Date: Wednesday, January 20, 1999 02:30 PM

Randy Silvers, of Tempe, Arizona, writes: "Rich as the English language is, it seems to lack one word that might ease tensions in many situations. Too often, politicians call members of the other party enemies or adversaries. Yet they also call Saddam Hussein an enemy. Clearly, there is a difference.

"One's enemies or adversaries want something different than what one wants. But Democrats and Republicans, with regard to most issues, want the same things; it is mainly over policy matters that they differ. For example, they all want minorities to succeed; the differernce is whether affirmative action aids minority success or hinders it. There are some issues in which they clearly have different objectives; it is on these that the word "enemy" is justified. The clarification of these two different positions would help in understanding the differences (policies or objectives) and thus where the room for compromise is.

"Another example might serve to illuminate: two players on the Denver Broncos both want to win, but one thinks they should play a zone defense the other a prevent defense. They are not enemies, in the way that a Jets player, who wants the Broncos to lose, is their enemy. Is there a word to describe someone who wants to reach the same goal but has a different belief about how to reach that goal?"

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Topic: 10) A disagreement among friends (2 of 5), Read 41 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Bill O'Connor (billoc@brinet.com)
Date: Sunday, January 24, 1999 06:15 PM

Among a Druid people who lived long ago in here in Henderson Co. there was such a word -nahcherway- used as "let's go over to Cold Mountain and hunt deer, but nahcherway". By the way there was an alternate spelling(or 2) one was - notchurwhey-

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Topic: 10) A disagreement among friends (3 of 5), Read 31 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Heidi Schroeder (zincats@aol.com)
Date: Tuesday, January 26, 1999 10:57 PM

Is there a word to describe someone who wants to reach the same goal but has a different belief about how to reach that goal?

How about ADVERSALLIES?

(But don't ask me how to pronounce it.)

-Heidi

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Topic: 10) A disagreement among friends (4 of 5), Read 32 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Barbara Wallraff (msgrammar@theatlantic.com)
Date: Wednesday, January 27, 1999 09:41 AM

Good idea, Heidi. Either that or friendemies frendemies frenemies (don't ask me how to spell it).

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Topic: 10) A disagreement among friends (5 of 5), Read 24 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Damon Davison (davison@excite.com)
Date: Thursday, January 28, 1999 06:23 PM

You are describing a "rival". It's a good word that can be used as both a noun and an adjective.


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