u_top picture

From the Word Fugitives archive...

That is despicable!

Please note: This page is a read-only archive of messages posted in the Word Fugitives conference of Post & Riposte.


TOP | Post | Reply | Reply/Quote | Email Reply | Delete | Edit
Previous | Next | Previous Topic | Next Topic
Topic: 6) That is despicable! (1 of 9), Read 72 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Barbara Wallraff (msgrammar@theatlantic.com)
Date: Wednesday, March 10, 1999 09:24 AM

Karenya Klein, of Hamden, Connecticut, writes: "If you suspect someone or something, you harbor a suspicion about them or it. If you despise someone or something, then you have or feel - what? Despicion?"

TOP | Post | Reply | Reply/Quote | Email Reply | Delete | Edit
Previous | Next | Previous Topic | Next Topic
Topic: 6) That is despicable! (2 of 9), Read 63 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Marv Kirk (marv_kirk_c74@post.harvard.edu)
Date: Wednesday, March 10, 1999 09:50 PM

How about "dispisal?"

TOP | Post | Reply | Reply/Quote | Email Reply | Delete | Edit
Previous | Next | Previous Topic | Next Topic
Topic: 6) That is despicable! (3 of 9), Read 63 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Dan Dillon (ddillon1@shrike.depaul.edu)
Date: Thursday, March 11, 1999 09:16 AM

Perhaps one feels abhorrence. Or execration. Or detestation.

But why the need for a nominalization at all? Seems to me just as well to despise someone.

TOP | Post | Reply | Reply/Quote | Email Reply | Delete | Edit
Previous | Next | Previous Topic | Next Topic
Topic: 6) That is despicable! (4 of 9), Read 56 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Glenn Werner (brshfire@frontiernet.net)
Date: Thursday, March 11, 1999 05:52 PM

Poor Karenya, why do you harbor disdain so?

TOP | Post | Reply | Reply/Quote | Email Reply | Delete | Edit
Previous | Next | Previous Topic | Next Topic
Topic: 6) That is despicable! (5 of 9), Read 42 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Michael Fischer (tsuwm@aol.com)
Date: Monday, March 15, 1999 03:57 PM

>Karenya Klein, of Hamden,
>Connecticut, writes: " If you despise
>someone or something, then you
>have or feel - what? Despicion?"


"despite" is a noun which describes the feeling or attitude of despising.




TOP | Post | Reply | Reply/Quote | Email Reply | Delete | Edit
Previous | Next | Previous Topic | Next Topic
Topic: 6) That is despicable! (6 of 9), Read 28 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Mark Harris (mth1234@yahoo.com)
Date: Thursday, March 18, 1999 07:15 PM

"despite" works better as a preposition than a noun; try its abbreviation, "spite."

TOP | Post | Reply | Reply/Quote | Email Reply | Delete | Edit
Previous | Next | Previous Topic | Next Topic
Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
Topic: 6) That is despicable! (7 of 9), Read 24 times
Conf: >
From: Michael Fischer (tsuwm@aol.com)
Date: Friday, March 19, 1999 01:40 AM

On 3/18/99 7:15:01 PM, Mark Harris wrote:
>"despite" works better as a
>preposition than a noun...

maybe so, but the noun form came first; just
trying to save some effort here through reuse. actually it has several senses as a noun: 1) contempt 2) malice or spite 3) detriment





TOP | Post | Reply | Reply/Quote | Email Reply | Delete | Edit
Previous | Next | Previous Topic | Next Topic
Topic: 6) That is despicable! (8 of 9), Read 21 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Marty Smith (marty@moonrat.com)
Date: Thursday, March 18, 1999 09:54 PM

I would say that if you despise something, what you feel for it is contempt (which has no other verb form).

Going out on a limb:

Suspect : Suspicion :: Despise : Contempt


TOP | Post | Reply | Reply/Quote | Email Reply | Delete | Edit
Previous | Next | Previous Topic | Next Topic
Topic: 6) That is despicable! (9 of 9), Read 17 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Michael Fischer (tsuwm@aol.com)
Date: Friday, March 19, 1999 01:45 AM

On 3/18/99 9:54:08 PM, Marty Smith wrote:
>I would say that if you
>despise something, what you
>feel for it is contempt (which
>has no other verb form).

I'm not sure what you mean by saying contempt has "no other verb form". The verb from the same Latin root is "contemn", meaning to treat with contempt or scorn, a synonym of despise.




Return to the
Court Record index.

Return to the Word Fugitives main page.

Copyright © 1999 by The Atlantic Monthly Company.
Cover Atlantic Unbound The Atlantic Monthly Post & Riposte Atlantic Store Search