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Darling, sweetie pie, honey

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Topic: 10) Darling, sweetie pie, honey (1 of 9), Read 147 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Barbara Wallraff (msgrammar@theatlantic.com)
Date: Wednesday, February 03, 1999 02:41 PM

Nan Goldberg, of Hackensack, New Jersey, writes: "Here's one that's sorely missing: a word to describe an adult person's significant other (ugh). Not 'boyfriend,' 'girlfriend,' 'mistress,' 'lover,' 'swain,' 'companion,' 'friend' (can't you just hear the quote marks?), 'partner' (too ridiculous), etc. etc."

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Topic: 10) Darling, sweetie pie, honey (2 of 9), Read 134 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: TeeGee Dee (tgd100@yahoo.com)
Date: Thursday, February 04, 1999 01:47 AM

How about the person's name, since the relationship is noone else's business and surely you can call he/she darling.

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Topic: 10) Darling, sweetie pie, honey (3 of 9), Read 130 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Jack Wilson (cbrac@aol.com)
Date: Thursday, February 04, 1999 11:25 AM

how about the word "entime"? (pronounced en teem). This sounds like French derivation. It is not salacious or unsocial and could be acceptable to nearly all.

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Topic: 10) Darling, sweetie pie, honey (4 of 9), Read 101 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Gregory Alan Bolcer (gbolcer@endeavors.org)
Date: Friday, February 05, 1999 12:19 PM

On 2/4/99 11:25:58 AM, Jack Wilson wrote:
>how about the word "entime"?
>(pronounced en teem). This
>sounds like French derivation.
>It is not salacious or
>unsocial and could be
>acceptable to nearly all.
>
My word for the more general genre: saccharinicities.

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Topic: 10) Darling, sweetie pie, honey (5 of 9), Read 109 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Michael Fischer (tsuwm@aol.com)
Date: Thursday, February 04, 1999 05:42 PM

I will posit: posslq

I'm told that this fun-to-pronounce acronym (pozz'l-cue) comes to us from the California tax code and/or the 1980 census form...
Person of the Opposite Sex Sharing Living Quarters

| There's nothing that I wouldn't do,
| If you would be my Posslq,
| You'd live for me and I for you
| If you would be my Posslq.
| ...
| ...
| We'd live forever, you and me,
| In blessed posslq-ity!


Note to Barbara: this little poem comes from some TV talking head and has nothing to do with Robert Bly!

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Topic: 10) Darling, sweetie pie, honey (6 of 9), Read 50 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Mary Jo McDermott (mcdermott_maryjo@allergan.com)
Date: Wednesday, February 10, 1999 02:35 PM

Why does the person have to have a word. Can't your just introduce him/her by her name? This is "so-and-so". If people know you, they'll know who this person is to you. If not, who cares what they think?

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Topic: 10) Darling, sweetie pie, honey (7 of 9), Read 90 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Tracy Durden (tdandaa@yahoo.com)
Date: Saturday, February 06, 1999 01:28 AM

My friend, Paul Kimoto, suggested the census' acronym: POSSLQ, pronounced "possle-cue." It stands for Persons of Opposite Sex Sharing Living Quarters. It doesn't cover all relationships, though.

Personally I took to using "consort" while my consort would say "We're a couple." I suppose "couplets" would be too silly (unless you rhyme, of course!).
;-)
Tracy Durden

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Topic: 10) Darling, sweetie pie, honey (8 of 9), Read 80 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: A. Prosper (prospero@uti.com)
Date: Monday, February 08, 1999 12:30 AM

Remember when the word, luv, made it's rounds in the 60's? This British immigrant was needed because turned-on dropped-out types needed an expression for their immature trek into egocentricity and hedonism which certainly had nothing to do with "love."

I'd be careful of you actual intentions if you feel the need to invent a word. What are you looking for? Love isn't new, you know. Yes, "significant other" ugh. But also, "POSSLQ" ugh, and "partner" really means something else.

Why not just plain ol' "my friend?" It can imply something quite gratifying. What? You want to say more? Go ahead. But one can't say more without saying more. Lover, mate, or bosom buddy. Whatever. Love is not new. I doubt there's a need to invent a word.

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Topic: 10) Darling, sweetie pie, honey (9 of 9), Read 9 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Linda Seger (linda.seger@worldnet.att.net)
Date: Monday, February 15, 1999 09:52 PM

Well, personally, I like "paramour." Although the word currently implies a lover of a married person, it also just means "sweetheart."


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