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Ark-worthy

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Topic: 2) Ark-worthy (1 of 18), Read 205 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Barbara Wallraff (msgrammar@theatlantic.com)
Date: Wednesday, June 30, 1999 09:18 AM

Bill Richards, of Vancouver, B.C., writes: "If a 'drought' is an extended period of time with no precipitation, what is the opposite, which we regularly experience in the winter in Vancouver: an extended period of time with lots and lots of precipitation? It may rain every day for three months.

"Just so I don't give the wrong idea about Vancouver, it usually doesn't rain at all in the last half of July, and all of August and September."

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Topic: 2) Ark-worthy (2 of 18), Read 192 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Roger Gay (roger.f.gay@telia.se)
Date: Wednesday, June 30, 1999 12:04 PM




rainy

Pronunciation: 'rA-nE
Function: adjective
Inflected Form(s): rainier; -est
Date: before 12th century

: marked by, abounding with, or bringing rain

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Topic: 2) Ark-worthy (3 of 18), Read 188 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Gillian Wogin (wogin.gillian@ic.gc.ca)
Date: Wednesday, June 30, 1999 01:20 PM

It's a wet spell.

On a similar theme, don't you think a "cold snap" is a wonderful understatement for a few days of bitterly cold weather.

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Topic: 2) Ark-worthy (4 of 18), Read 177 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: William Richards (richards@sfu.ca)
Date: Wednesday, June 30, 1999 07:40 PM

"rainy" doesn't work. It's an adjective; drought is a noun. I'm looking for a noun that means "an extended period of time with lots and lots of precipitation," rather than a word that describes the weather at a point in time. I believe a monsoon is a single storm which, alghough it may last a few days, doesn't quite do the trick.

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Topic: 2) Ark-worthy (5 of 18), Read 175 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Michael Fischer (tsuwm@aol.com)
Date: Wednesday, June 30, 1999 10:31 PM

On 6/30/99 7:40:28 PM, William Richards wrote:
>I believe a monsoon is a single
>storm which, alghough it may
>last a few days, doesn't
>quite do the trick.

well, that's one sense of monsoon. here is
the second sense (per Merriam-Webster's 10th Collegiate): the season of the southwest monsoon in India and adjacent areas that is characterized by very heavy rainfall. it seems like the perfect word to me!



today's wwftd is...

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Topic: 2) Ark-worthy (6 of 18), Read 178 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Roger Gay (roger.f.gay@telia.se)
Date: Thursday, July 01, 1999 12:18 PM

monsoon has to do with wind in India

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Topic: 2) Ark-worthy (7 of 18), Read 182 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Michael Fischer (tsuwm@aol.com)
Date: Wednesday, June 30, 1999 03:09 PM

...but Bill wanted something to parallel "a drought". howz about "a monsoon"?!

today's wwftd is...

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Topic: 2) Ark-worthy (8 of 18), Read 175 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Chris Tozier (crtozier@facstaff.wisc.edu)
Date: Thursday, July 01, 1999 12:27 PM

monsoons are a wind directional shift that occurs in the Indian Ocean. The shift causes increased rainfall. The term "monsoon" is more similar to the term "winter", than it is to the antonym of "drought."

think of it this way:

"We are having a drought."

Fill in drought with a rainy equivalent, and you have your answer.
How about flood?

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Topic: 2) Ark-worthy (9 of 18), Read 171 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Michael Fischer (tsuwm@aol.com)
Date: Thursday, July 01, 1999 03:05 PM

to quote Bill: "I'm looking for a noun that means "an extended period of time with lots and lots of precipitation,""

to quote the definition I quoted earlier:
the season of the southwest monsoon in India and adjacent areas that is characterized by very heavy rainfall

I merely suggested that here is a perfectly good word that can be (and probably has been) borrowed for the situation at hand.

today's wwftd is...

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Topic: 2) Ark-worthy (10 of 18), Read 163 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Royce Alden (royce2000@yahoo)
Date: Thursday, July 01, 1999 06:16 PM

How about "Seattle Mist"

...missed Seattle, hit Vancouver...

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Topic: 2) Ark-worthy (11 of 18), Read 149 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Michael Fischer (tsuwm@aol.com)
Date: Friday, July 02, 1999 10:35 AM

>I merely suggested that here
>is a perfectly good word that
>can be (and probably has been)
>borrowed for the situation at
>hand.

Arizona Monsoon


BTW, monsoon is from Arabic and means "season", so monsoon season is a pleonasm : )

today's wwftd is...

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Topic: 2) Ark-worthy (12 of 18), Read 145 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: William Richards (richards@sfu.ca)
Date: Friday, July 02, 1999 02:58 PM

Monsoon -The word "monsoon" appears to have originated from the Arabic word mausim which means season. It is most often applied to the seasonal reversals of the wind direction along the shores of the Indian Ocean, especially in the Arabian Sea, that blow from the southwest during one half of the year and from the northeast during the other. As monsoons have come to be better understood, the definition has been broadened to include almost all of the phenomena associated with the annual weather cycle within the tropical and subtropical continents of Asia, Australia and Africa and the adjaacent seas and oceans. It is within these regions that the most vigorous and dramatic cycles of weather events on the earth takes place.
- from The Elementary Monsoon by Peter Webster.

Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, is not considered tropical or subtropical. The extended periods of time in which it rains almost every day are not dramatic or vigouous; the rain is often a gentle mist and is seldom the hard deluge that one sees in the summer in the midwest US. There may be a breeze, but strong wind is unusual. I don't think monsoon works because Vancouver isn't tropical or subtropical; the rain isn't associated with seasonal reversals of the wind direction along the shores of the Indian Ocean; and we do not see the most vigorous and dramatic cycles of weather events on the earth taking place here.

From Appendix III of Major World Crop Areas and Climatic Profiles(Handbook of Agriculture #664)Published by the Joint Agricultural Weather Facility (USDA/NOAA):

The Indian Monsoon and Its Impact on Agriculture
A monsoon is defined as a seasonal shift in wind direction, being derived from the Arabic word "mausim", meaning season (3). The word itself does not mean heavy rain, although the misnomer is not baseless. In a true monsoon climate, seasonal wind shifts typically cause a drastic change in the general precipitation and temperature patterns. However, the monsoon may also be associated with dry weather as well, since the "wet" monsoon phase of warm, moist air is seasonally replaced by a "dry" monsoon of cool, dry air. This phenomenon is the dominant feature of low-latitude climates stretching from West Africa to the western Pacific Ocean.

My friend Doug suggests "wetska" as a new word for what I described.

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Topic: 2) Ark-worthy (13 of 18), Read 145 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Michael Fischer (tsuwm@aol.com)
Date: Friday, July 02, 1999 03:46 PM

evidently the "Arizona (or Mexican) monsoon" is so named because of similar wind/weather patterns.

today's wwftd is...

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Topic: 2) Ark-worthy (14 of 18), Read 132 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: William Richards (richards@sfu.ca)
Date: Sunday, July 04, 1999 01:37 PM

Bill,

While sitting at Death by Chocolate this evening with my two daughters, I posed your question to them. "What is the opposite of drought?" Without a clear answer, I then asked "What new word may describe the Vancouver experience?" Christin suggested "wought".

Now initially I suggested that wought was wussy, but I had to admit that the wought weather system has a clearly wussy feel. To appreciate the word one must use it in a few sentences.

Vancouver is weathering a wought!

Will this wought wind up soon?

How about this wought.

Given this word structure one may also suggest that a snow season could be a snought. Therefore where Alberta tends to go from drought to snought; Vancouver just goes from wought to wought.

What makes a wought so depressing is when you find yourself commenting that the sky is brighter today [rather than the sky is sunny]. To be positive about the clouds being just a little less gloomy is definitely living in a wought.

Well, that was Christin's suggestion. If you like it, it's yours.

Doug

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Topic: 2) Ark-worthy (15 of 18), Read 131 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Aaron Reneker (zanazarius@yahoo.com)
Date: Sunday, July 04, 1999 11:37 PM

The fact that you were sitting at a place called Death By Cholocate is extraordianarily cruel...where is it, and how do I get there?
Oh, and I like "wought." But I like chocolate more....

Aaron Reneker

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Topic: 2) Ark-worthy (16 of 18), Read 23 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Alecia Ramsay (akgrrrl@yahoo.com)
Date: Thursday, September 02, 1999 05:28 PM

How about a "deluge?"

Main Entry: deluge
Pronunciation: 'del-"yj, -"yzh; d&-'lj, 'dA-"lj
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Old French, from Latin diluvium, from diluere to wash away, from dis- + lavere to wash
Date: 14th century
1 a : an overflowing of the land by water
b : a drenching rain
(from
http://www.m-w.com/dictionary)

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Topic: 2) Ark-worthy (17 of 18), Read 114 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Jonathan Gellman (kirschgell@earthlink.net)
Date: Tuesday, July 06, 1999 09:15 PM

If the opposite of a drought is a form of drunkenness, I would suggest either a "binge" of wet weather, or, with a nod to localized weather and wit in Vancouver, the thought that the city is "vin-couvert" with a frequent spill and spell of wet weather.

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Topic: 2) Ark-worthy (18 of 18), Read 81 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Richard Fennell (rmfenn@aol.com)
Date: Thursday, July 22, 1999 01:14 PM

flood.

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Topic: Ark-worthy (1 of 2), Read 65 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: David Bergman (deb1267@yahoo.com)
Date: Saturday, July 24, 1999 09:58 PM

Hello, I'm not a "word person" but I do have a graduate degree in Geography. When I lectured to undergraduates we refereed to a prolonged wet period as a pluval period or just a pluval. I think it comes from the latin word for rain. An example of the words usage would be: "during a pluvial period temporary lakes form which are ephemeral in nature."

Does this work for you?

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Topic: Ark-worthy (2 of 2), Read 69 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Michael Fischer (tsuwm@aol.com)
Date: Sunday, July 25, 1999 02:29 AM

there is a noun form of this:

pluvial - a prolonged period of wet climate

today's wwftd is...


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