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Acro-batty

Please note: This page is a read-only archive of messages posted in the Word Fugitives conference of Post & Riposte.


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Topic: 3) Acro-batty (1 of 23), Read 183 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Barbara Wallraff (msgrammar@theatlantic.com)
Date: Wednesday, April 28, 1999 10:15 AM

Doug Villa, of Phoenix, Ariz., writes: "I wonder if there is a word for the urge that you get if you are standing on the edge of a bridge or up on the side of a mountain. It gives you butterflies in your stomach and you want to 'go for it' -- but at the same time you don't, because you could be hurt. Please don't think I am suicidal or anything. Most people I have asked know that feeling, so I am pretty sure I am not crazy. Some have told me that they want to jump just for the feeling of it. But they don't, because of the serious injuries that could happen.

"A couple years ago I was visiting a university and met a psych grad student. I asked her if this word existed and she wasn't sure. A couple days later I ran into her again, and she told me she asked around and there were about five other students and two professors searching the library because they all knew there had to be a word for it. This has puzzled me for years."

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Topic: 3) Acro-batty (2 of 23), Read 177 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Roger Gay (roger.f.gay@telia.se)
Date: Wednesday, April 28, 1999 04:15 PM

Here's a theory for you. The feeling you describe may be related to height vertigo. I'll present my argument after a description of it.

Height Vertigo

Height vertigo is a type of physiological vertigo due to visually induced instability and occurs when the observer is a certain height above the ground where stationary objects in the visual field are far off in the distance. Height vertigo usually occurs above three meters and reaches it's maximum at 20 meters of height. Ordinarily, the body has a normal amount of body sway which is constantly being corrected for. The further away a stationary object is, the greater the degree of body sway must occur before a movement is detected and compensated for. This is the physiological basis for height vertigo which over time may progressively worsen and become a fear of heights with its associated psychological reactions. Height vertigo is worsened by standing, staring at moving objects overhead such as clouds, and by looking through binoculars which reduce the peripheral field. Height vertigo is reduced by sitting or lying down or looking at a stationary object which is on the same plane and close to the observer.

Source: United States Naval Flight Surgeon's Manual: Third Edition 1991: Chapter 7: Neurology, Vertigo and Disequilibrium


The key point is that "The further away a stationary object is, the greater the degree of body sway must occur before a movement is detected and compensated for." In order to compensate for a very great distance, you would have to move (sway) to an extreme degree. Height vertigo could explain your butterflies and the subtle suggestion to jump to achieve enormous compensatory sway.

Come to think of it, I believe there's an easy way to find out for sure. Don't get ticked if this doesn't work. A few years ago, I visited the Grand Coulee. I remember the feeling. It seems to me that a park ranger was explaining to a group of tourist about that feeling. It would seem to me that if anyone (that can be easily identified) would be carrying around that information, it would be a park ranger at somewhere like the Grand Coulee or the Grand Canyon National Park.

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Topic: 3) Acro-batty (3 of 23), Read 148 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Mark Harris (mth1234@yahoo.com)
Date: Saturday, May 01, 1999 01:20 PM

>Doug Villa, of Phoenix, Ariz., writes:
>"I wonder if there is a word for the urge
>that you get if you are standing on the edge
>of a bridge..."

Doug:
Your urge is a catapulsion; i.e., a downward urge or drive. We could say that you feel "catapelled" to fling yourself--or that you want to "catapel" yourself--from a bridge. We could say that bungee jumpers have "catapulsive" tendencies.

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Topic: 3) Acro-batty (4 of 23), Read 133 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Aaron Reneker (zanazarius@yahoo.com)
Date: Tuesday, May 04, 1999 06:25 PM

I've also heard this referred to as "vertigo," although I don't believe the clinical definition is the same.

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Topic: 3) Acro-batty (5 of 23), Read 89 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Roger Gay (roger.f.gay@telia.se)
Date: Wednesday, May 12, 1999 01:31 AM

Aaron,

I've spoken with a couple of specialists just to be sure. Vertigo is typically used for the more intense feeling of dizziness and other side effects that occur when you're not up so high. According to the flight surgeon's manual; Height vertigo usually occurs above three meters and reaches it's maximum at 20 meters of height.

So it depends in part on how high the bridge is. At least in terms of the heights in which vertigo normally occurs, you could still have an intense reaction at about 50-100 feet.

I tried contacting a nature institute in the area of the Grand Canyon with the question. They listed an MD on their staff. But no one responded. I also looked for e-mail addresses for the Grand Canyon National Park, but didn't find anything that looked appropriate.

Are we racing to check the registered members of the forum? Maybe there's someone who lives near the Grand Coulee or the Grand Canyon and has been there many times who knows the answer to the question.

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Topic: 3) Acro-batty (6 of 23), Read 107 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Rus Bowden (lowelldude@aol.com)
Date: Tuesday, May 11, 1999 04:10 PM

Mark,

Your contribution of the word "catapulsion" intrigued me. For my own satisfaction, I tried looking it up, only to find in my limited resources that to catapult is to hurl, and it seemed that this hurling was more upward or outward.

My quest to find a word that I could contribute led me to a great web site called "Skydiving History and Culture" at
http://www.afn.org/skydive/culture/. Now, I didn't find a word, but I found some stuff that would support Doug Villa's contention that he is not crazy.

For example, in the page called, "Novelty Seekers and Drug Abusers Tap Same Brain Reward System
," I found this, "In a series of experiments, he {Dr. Michael Bardo of the University of Kentucky} found that given a free choice, rats liked novelty and that this preference for novelty could be eliminated by administering a drug that blocked the rats' brain receptors for dopa-mine, a neurotransmitter associated with pleasure and drug abuse. Dr. Bardo also found that rats raised to seek novelty were more sensitive to the acute rewarding effects of amphetamines than were rats raised not to seek novelty. In addition, Dr. Bardo's research team demonstrated that novelty seeking activates the mesolimbic dopamine system, the brain's reward pathway, in the same way that drugs of abuse do."

And on the page called, "The Lesson of the Moth", I found this remarkable poem:

i was talking to a moth
the other evening
he was trying to break into
an electric light bulb
and fry himself on the wires

why do you fellows
pull this stunt i asked him
because it is the conventional
thing for moths or why
if that had been an uncovered
candle instead of an electric
light bulb you would
now be a small unsightly cinder
have you no sense

plenty of it he answered
but at times we get tired
of using it
we get bored with the routine
and crave beauty
and excitement
fire is beautiful
and we know that if we get
too close it will kill us
but what does that matter
it is better to be happy
for a moment
and be burned up with beauty
than to live a long time
and be bored all the while
so we wad all our life up
into one little toll
and then we shoot the roll
that is what life is for
it is better to be part of beauty
for one instant and then cease to
exist than to exist forever
and never be a part of beauty
our attitude toward life
is come easy go easy
we are like human beings
used to be before they became too civilized
to enjoy themselves

and before i could argue him
out of his philosophy
he went and immolated himself
on a patent cigar lighter
i do not agree with him
myself i would rather have half the happiness and twice
the longevity
but at the same time i wish
there was something i wanted
as badly as he wanted to fry himself


-by Don Marquis

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Topic: 3) Acro-batty (7 of 23), Read 104 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Michael Fischer (tsuwm@aol.com)
Date: Tuesday, May 11, 1999 05:32 PM

"For my own satisfaction, I tried looking it up, only to find in my limited resources that to catapult is to hurl, and it seemed that this hurling was more upward or outward."

It's not your resources; catapult has a pretty narrow meaning and few inflected forms; it comes almost intact from Latin via Greek. (also, in British it means slingshot.)

Anything that is hurled up is pretty much compelled to eventually come down; not to put too much gravitas into the situation.

(I wonder how much flak will be hurled my way for splitting that infinitive....)

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Topic: 3) Acro-batty (8 of 23), Read 72 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Barbara Wallraff (msgrammar@theatlantic.com)
Date: Friday, May 14, 1999 09:33 AM

Rus,

I've been meaning since I first saw your post here to bestow upon you a Word Fugitives Bureau of Investigation Special Agent of the Week Award. I mean, skydiving, drug research, and Don Marquis all in one -- very creative! It's a busy time in the magazine's cycle, so I mustn't go on and on praising you, even though you deserve it. The prizegiver will be in touch about your well-earned prize. Huzzah! Three cheers!



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Topic: 3) Acro-batty (9 of 23), Read 64 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Rus Bowden (lowelldude@aol.com)
Date: Friday, May 14, 1999 07:07 PM

Barbara,

I am honored to be a Word Fugitives Bureau of Investigation Special Agent of the Week. Thank you very much.

Word Fugitives has become my favorite pastime. I love this place!

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Topic: It's a systemic instability. (10 of 23), Read 92 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Roger Gay (roger.f.gay@telia.se)
Date: Wednesday, May 12, 1999 02:45 AM

OK, I've got some ideas. First of all, let me set the stage. I take it that we won't accept the term vertigo unless there are more intense symptoms, such as dizziness and nausea. (We might be wrong.) But still, I also take it that the cause of height vertigo given in the Flight Surgeon's Manual, is also the cause of what we're being asked to find a word for -- it's just that the symptoms are not as intense. As I understand it, not everyone actually suffers vertigo (nauseating dizziness, etc.), but that does not give me cause to believe that other people have no reaction to heights at all.

Doug Villa describes his reaction; "It gives you butterflies in your stomach and you want to 'go for it"

I believe there is good reason to think that the cause of his butterflies is the same as the cause of nauseating dizziness for those who experience vertigo -- which I take to be nothing more than a more intense physical reaction.

Look at the cause of vertigo again.

Ordinarily, the body has a normal amount of body sway which is constantly being corrected for. The further away a stationary object is, the greater the degree of body sway must occur before a movement is detected and compensated for. This is the physiological basis for height vertigo ...

Source: United States Naval Flight Surgeon's Manual: Third Edition 1991: Chapter 7: Neurology, Vertigo and Disequilibrium


This is the physiological basis for vertigo, but it happens all the time, whether you end up feeling terribly dizzy or not. For those who like to look around while they're standing next to the Grand Canyon or who put a quarter in the binoculars, there's this.

Height vertigo is worsened by standing, staring at moving objects overhead such as clouds, and by looking through binoculars which reduce the peripheral field. Height vertigo is reduced by sitting or lying down or looking at a stationary object which is on the same plane and close to the observer.

Again, what's being explained here happens whether you end up feeling terribly dizzy or not. Note also Doug's story about the psychology students. I'll also assume that there's no word for this, if you don't accept vertigo. Rather than approaching it looking directly for an established medical term, I'm going to start with what we know and look for a general term based on the cause. I'm going to think as though I'm modeling the phenomenon mathematically. I'm starting with a term given in the first sentence of the description in the Flight Surgeon's manual.

Height vertigo is a type of physiological vertigo due to visually induced instability and occurs when the observer is a certain height above the ground where stationary objects in the visual field are far off in the distance.

It's due to visually induced instability. If we weren't such hard-core new-word addicts, we might be satisfied with that. Based on what I've said, I'd conclude that he has experienced visually induced instability. The source of this terminology is quite credible.

Based on the wording of the original question, I'll eliminate much of the whole reaction to the instability. Doug (and others) stabilize the situation and themselves psychologically.

-- but at the same time you don't, because you could be hurt. Please don't think I am suicidal or anything. Most people I have asked know that feeling, so I am pretty sure I am not crazy. Some have told me that they want to jump just for the feeling of it. But they don't, because of the serious injuries that could happen.

What we're being asked for is a word that describes the initial feeling, not the "final solution" in which someone goes for a more stable feeling. So I'm going to eliminate everything concerning this stabilization, and concentrate solely on the instability that gives the feeling of butterflies on one's stomach.

(see next -- I don't want you to have to read too much in one post)

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Topic: THE SOLUTION (11 of 23), Read 101 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Roger Gay (roger.f.gay@telia.se)
Date: Wednesday, May 12, 1999 02:57 AM

Visually Induced Instability

Ordinarily, the body has a normal amount of body sway which is constantly being corrected for. The further away a stationary object is, the greater the degree of body sway must occur before a movement is detected and compensated for.

Recalling that as I rode the train to the office this morning, I recognized that the word instability would apply. (Happily, when I looked at the Flight Surgeon's description again, so did they.)

Well, now that I think about it, that is it. If you want just one word, the word is instability. If you want to be more specific, the term is visually induced instability. Source: US Naval Flight Surgeon's Manual.

If you want one specific word, it should be one that means visually induced instability.

I did a search on the term "induced instability" hoping that it might lead me to a word described in such a way. All I found was "induced instability" with at least one more term describing how the instability was induced. Examples:

radiation induced instability
lake-induced instability
flow induced instability
fluid-induced instability
buoyancy-induced instability
wave-induced instability

If you want to knock yourself out though, here's something to build on.

stable (adjective): stabilis
visual (adjective): visualis
negation "in" or "un" (latin): in-
induce: inducere, from in- + ducere

So obviously, the words "visually induced instability" are pretty Latin to begin with.

That's not to say that there's no such thing as a word that means a particular type (or class) of instability. One that comes to mind is the class of instabilities dubbed by a French mathematician as "Catastrophe". The circumstances we're talking about do suggest that. But Catastrophe is a more term general than visually induced instability, and suggests in common English that he gave in to the feeling to "go for it".

(BTW: I went to a lot of effort on this one. I'm not a flight surgeon. I spent several hours performing various web searches and following up leads. That's how I found the big lead in the
Flight Surgeon's Manual.

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Topic: Acro-batty (12 of 23), Read 79 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Rus Bowden (lowelldude@aol.com)
Date: Wednesday, May 12, 1999 11:24 PM

Roger,

I feel like one of the psychology students that Doug Villa mentioned. I am stumped. And so far, I think you have made the two best contributions. Yet I have problems with each. So for the time being, I'm left with the role of devil's advocate.

With visually induced instability, there is a need for instability. Yet I don't see that butterflies in ones stomach and a feeling that you want to "go for it" amounts to instability. Also, as a mathematical model, you left out the height factor that you had with height vertigo. So if I'm a bit unstable, because I just got poked in the eye, I would have visually induced instability. And this seems too far away from our goal.

Height vertigo? This very well might be what we are looking for. The butterflies support it, unless they are due to the potential excitement to follow and not the visual stimuli. I'm taken by the fact that "butterflies" and "going for it" were in Doug Villa's same breath, "It gives you butterflies in your stomach and you want to 'go for it' -- but at the same time you don't, because you could be hurt."

I grew up here in Lowell, Massachusetts where we have these big brick mill buildings from the Industrial Revolution. As a teen, my friends and I use to climb up the fire escapes to the rooftops. We would jump from building to building only if we thought we could make the sometimes challenging distance. Let me explain what it was like when the distance was too daring: "It gives you butterflies in your stomach and you want to 'go for it' -- but at the same time you don't, because you could be hurt."

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Topic: Acro-batty (13 of 23), Read 51 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Roger Gay (roger.f.gay@telia.se)
Date: Monday, May 17, 1999 05:14 AM

With visually induced instability, there is a need for instability. Yet I don't see that butterflies in ones stomach and a feeling that you want to "go for it" amounts to instability.

You have it backwards. Butterflies or whatever you experience are symptoms that result from the instability. The Flight Surgeon's Manual does a good job of explaining what the instability is. I'm quite competent with mathematics, and it was clear to me that the term instability applies as well. Your system (body) is trying to compensate for motion in a way that leads to greater compensation in motion. The systemic response isn't convergent, it's divergent. It was clear to me from that, that we're talking about "instability". But that doesn't mean that you have to fall down, if that's what you're thinking. As I said in an earlier post, the human reaction is much more complex, and finds a way to compensate for the instability. If you take the advise in the Manual, you'll probably do better. On the other hand, if you just let yourself go and respond with the compensations the body automatically calls for, you might end up falling down. As for the feeling that you should "go for it"; I've said that the automatic compensation goes in all directions. The one that really gets your attention though, is the direction over the edge. That's also the direction that creates the visually induced instability in the first place.

Also, as a mathematical model, you left out the height factor that you had with height vertigo. So if I'm a bit unstable, because I just got poked in the eye, I would have visually induced instability. And this seems too far away from our goal.

Read again. I didn't leave out the height factor. The manual says you've got the greatest chance of experiencing the greatest symptoms of vertigo within a certain range. Not everyone gets really dizzy climbing on a ladder though. I bet if you've never done it before, you'd go bonkers on a high rise construction site. But there are people who are quite used to it.

Height vertigo? This very well might be what we are looking for. The butterflies support it, unless they are due to the potential excitement to follow and not the visual stimuli. I'm taken by the fact that "butterflies" and "going for it" were in Doug Villa's same breath, "It gives you butterflies in your stomach and you want to 'go for it' -- but at the same time you don't, because you could be hurt."

If you accept "height vertigo", you have to accept "visually induced instability". According to the manual, height vertigo is a type of physiological vertigo due to visually induced instability.

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Topic: Acro-batty (14 of 23), Read 27 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Rus Bowden (lowelldude@aol.com)
Date: Monday, May 24, 1999 08:37 AM

The way I view this, if it's not "height vertigo", which it may be, I would call it "jump euphoria" or, more specifically, "momentary jump euphoria". I chose "jump", because it is the method of suicide, even though it is more often used for jumping up or forward.

It seems to work in context for how I viewed the situation. One could say, "I just looked over the side of the bridge and had jump euphoria.

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Topic: Acro-batty (15 of 23), Read 24 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Roger Gay (roger.f.gay@telia.se)
Date: Tuesday, May 25, 1999 07:46 AM

Sounds rather macabre.

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Topic: Acro-batty (16 of 23), Read 22 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Rus Bowden (lowelldude@aol.com)
Date: Tuesday, May 25, 1999 09:27 AM

Roger,

Well, that's what the euphoria is all about, jumping off the side of a bridge, or off a mountain, momentarily considering a very harmful jump, as if it was something to consider. I tried replacing "jump" with some synonyms, like using "leap euphoria" instead, but "leap" seems such a secondary term to "jump" in this context, and it would still, I think, contain any macabre connotations that "jump" has. My second choice is "free fall euphoria". It contains the feeling of considering the fall, but doesn't have the "go for it" aspect that "jump" has.

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Topic: Acro-batty (17 of 23), Read 24 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Roger Gay (roger.f.gay@telia.se)
Date: Tuesday, May 25, 1999 09:42 AM

Well, that's what the euphoria is all about, jumping off the side of a bridge, or off a mountain, momentarily considering a very harmful jump, ...

Imaginative, but we've already explored the cause and based on information from a credible source we know that it's wrong.

The feeling comes from visual instability. The consideration of falling or jumping off results from an automatic response intended to compensate for the instability. You've made the mistake of assuming that correspondence and causality are the same.

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Topic: Acro-batty (18 of 23), Read 22 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Rus Bowden (lowelldude@aol.com)
Date: Tuesday, May 25, 1999 11:12 AM

Roger,

Look with me again at the causality. As I see it we are not limited to the urge being from visually induced instability, which it may be, and therefore would be "height vertigo." (I visited that site, The Flight Surgeon's Manual. Right on, Roger!)

Doug Villa made no mention of the cause, just the places where the urge happens. From what he says, the urge could come like the urge to dive into the water at the beach, or the urge to dance or eat at a party. There is visual stimulation, but the urge follows from an associative thought process. In this case, our urge would be "jump euphoria" and "height vertigo" would only loosely or poetically apply.

What about the butterflies, you ask? Let's examine Doug's statement further; "You get butterflies in your stomach and you want to 'go for it'..." The use of the word "and" here can mean the "butterflies" feeling and "go for it" thought are virtually simultaneous. The Random House College Dictionary gives the following definitions for "and": 1. (used to connect grammatically coordinate words, phrases, or clauses) with; along with; together with; added to; in addition to: 'pens and pencils' 2. as well as: 'nice and warm'. 4. also, at the same time: 'to sleep and dream'.

Granted, the same dictionary gives the following definition: 3. then: 'He read for an hour and went to bed.' This morning, I made a pot of coffee and vacuumed the living room. That was the order I did them in, but how can you be sure, unless I tell you?

The problem with reversing ("You want to 'go for it' and you get butterflies in your stomach -- but you don't because you know you could be hurt") is that the meaning changes when viewed from the "then" definition of "and". It changes in the sense of how "jump euphoria" is viewed. The butterflies would necessarily follow the thought in this view.

Let's return to the urge to dance at a party. Let's say your having "dance euphoria" (humor me). You see this beautiful woman. "You get butterflies in your stomach and you want to 'go for it' -- but you don't because you know you could be hurt."

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Topic: Acro-batty (19 of 23), Read 23 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Roger Gay (roger.f.gay@telia.se)
Date: Tuesday, May 25, 1999 11:23 AM

Rus,

That's too much of a stretch. Give it up!

We've already examined why it might not be height vertigo. It's because the term vertigo suggests a specific reaction that some people have at some heights. We generally came to the conclusion that if the person isn't very dizzy and feeling nausea, then it's probably not vertigo.

That does not however, eliminate the more general description -- visually induced instability -- as the proper description of the wider phenomenon. Thus, even when the reaction is not "vertigo", but only butterflies and an urge to compensate for the instability ("to go for it"), that still falls very nicely within the general description.

Height vertigo is only a special case of visually induced instability. Therefore, logically, if it's not visually induced instability, it can't be height vertigo. But the inverse is not true, since we're talking about a general class an a specific instance. You can't show that it's not visually induced instability by showing that it might not be height vertigo.

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Topic: Acro-batty (20 of 23), Read 23 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Rus Bowden (lowelldude@aol.com)
Date: Tuesday, May 25, 1999 12:26 PM

Roger,

There is nothing that is tying us into assuming that the butterflies are visually induced. Sure we have visual stimulation. That is why I used the analogy of a beautiful woman for the butterflies. It's a visual situation with butterflies, but no visually induced instability, which suggests physical instability resulting directly from visual input.

The problem with "visually induced instability" is that it can apply to the other types of vertigo as well as height vertigo. Let me cite the Flight Surgeon's Manual
(http://www.vnh.org/FSManual/07/05Vertigo.html) also:

"Height Vertigo
"Height vertigo is a type of physiological vertigo due to visually induced instability and occurs when the observer is a certain height above the ground where stationary objects in the visual field are far off in the distance. Height vertigo usually occurs above three meters and reaches it's maximum at 20 meters of height....

"Visual Vertigo
"Another type of physiological vertigo is visual vertigo, also called optic kinetic motion sickness, or pseudo-coriolis vertigo. This is induced by viewing moving objects and responding to the perceived motion with a change in posture. For example, while viewing a movie of an automobile, airplane or other type of movement, the viewer characteristically turns their body in the direction of the visual stimulus in an attempt to accomplish postural stability...."

Visual vertigo is also visually induced instability. It's just that the writer used a different phrase, "This is induced by viewing..." That's why I think "height vertigo" is better, more to the point, than visually induced instability.

Notice that height vertigo can kick in as low as three meters. That's why I don't think it has to be such a nauseous, extreme spinning as serious cases of vertigo. It may have more to do with a milder linear vertigo, than a spinning vertigo.

Plus, "butterflies" and "going for it" may be only two of the symptoms. So that Doug Villa's description could apply to, not only a mild case of height vertigo, but the onset of a more severe case of it, like having a mild cold, but not laid up, yet anyway.

So I stand by "jump euphoria" in cases of cognitively induced butterflies and "height vertigo" in cases of visually induced butterflies.

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Topic: 3) Acro-batty (21 of 23), Read 51 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Roger Gay (roger.f.gay@telia.se)
Date: Monday, May 17, 1999 09:39 AM

How about;

Distant attraction

Dangerous Contemplated Liaison (DCL)

Or, due to the fact that one puts that urge to "go for it" (vertically speaking) in check, vertistop instead of vertigo.

Or, in recognition of that giddy butterflies-in-your-stomach feeling, how about vertibuzz?
Usage: "Hey man, I'm gettin' a vertibuzz."

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Topic: 3) Acro-batty (22 of 23), Read 39 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Rus Bowden (lowelldude@aol.com)
Date: Monday, May 17, 1999 10:33 PM

Roger

Good, but if you use "vertibuzz", people will think you're high.

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Topic: 3) Acro-batty (23 of 23), Read 41 times
Conf: Word Fugitives, with Barbara Wallraff
From: Roger Gay (roger.f.gay@telia.se)
Date: Tuesday, May 18, 1999 03:54 AM

Good, but if you use "vertibuzz", people will think you're high.

Chuckle. You did intend the play on words, or ....??


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