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mcvs9706 picture seahorse picture The AIDS Exception:
Privacy vs. Public Health


We don't routinely test people for AIDS or HIV when they're admitted to hospitals -- or when they're pregnant. We don't routinely insist that the sex or needle-sharing partners of infected people be sought out and notified. If there were once persuasive reasons for not doing these things, the author writes, there aren't any longer.

by Chandler Burr


Web-Only: Privacy vs. Public Health? Join Chandler Burr and a panel of experts and activists for an interactive roundtable discussion.

seahorse picture Do We Consume Too Much?

From a strictly materialistic point of view, the author argues, the common idea that increasing consumption will lead to depletion and scarcity is mistaken: "It is simply wrong to believe that nature sets physical limits to economic growth." But there is more to it than that.

by Mark Sagoff
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Reports

Notes & Comment: The Positive Negative
A connoisseur savors his favorite American speech anomaly.
by Ian Frazier

Philosophy: The Wittgenstein Controversy
The 30,000 pages of manuscript that Ludwig Wittgenstein left behind have prompted more feuding than philosophizing.
by Evelyn Toynton

Society: Slow Death in the Great Plains
No longer just leaving America's heartland, people aren't even being born there.
by Harlow A. Hyde

Americana: Late Edition
The author remembers a printing press, and one story it never told -- its own.
by John Fleischman

Fiction & Poetry

The Fragging
A short story
by Larry Heinemann

An Explanation
A poem
by Brendan Galvin

Tagging the Stealer
A poem
by Greg Delanty

Unanswered Prayers
A poetry anthology
by Cathy Smith Bowers, Reginald Gibbons, Brooks Haxton, Patricia Hooper, Mark Jarman, and David J. Rothman

Browse previous issues of The Atlantic Monthly.
Arts & Leisure

Travel: Transylvania Today
This corner of the Balkans offers an entry point into a "twilight zone of European history" where even modernity is somewhat medieval.
by Jeffrey Tayler

seahorse picture Music: The Man From Heaven
Burt Bacharach has improbably become a figure of cult adulation among the young.
by Francis Davis

Books

The Life of Job in Exurbia
American Pastoral, by Philip Roth
by Ralph Lombreglia

seahorse picture How Powerful Is Advertising?
Breaking Up America: Advertisers and the New Media World, by Joseph Turow
by Randall Rothenberg

Brief Reviews
by Phoebe-Lou Adams

Other Departments

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Contributors

Letters
(Send a letter to the editor.)

The June Almanac

The Puzzler
by Emily Cox & Henry Rathvon

Word Improvisation
by J. E. Lighter

The seahorse symbol indicates that an article is supplemented with additional Atlantic material, such as related articles, audio, or special online sidebars.

All material copyright © 1997 by The Atlantic Monthly Company. All rights reserved.
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