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After the Wars

Yugoslavia and the World

FOUR years have passed since the Dayton Accords brought a complicated, bitter peace to Bosnia. Almost a year has passed since NATO air strikes drove Serbian forces out of the Yugoslav province of Kosovo, making possible another complicated, bitter peace. Soldiers from the United States, Great Britain, Russia, and many other countries -- all told, some 65,000 strong -- are now stationed as peacekeepers in the Balkans. Besides a considerable reduction in violence -- no small achievement -- what has the world's intervention wrought? Our correspondents, taking stock, address three subjects. Charles Trueheart ["A New Kind of Justice"] looks at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, which is investigating war crimes and putting alleged perpetrators on trial, and at the surprising precedent the tribunal may have set. Chuck Sudetic ["The Reluctant Gendarme"] explains why indicted war criminals can live with impunity in the sector of Bosnia controlled by the French. And David Rieff ["Midnight in Sarajevo"], who lived in and reported from Sarajevo during its years of siege, returns to a city that may represent a portent for Kosovo: physically safe but spiritually and socially ravaged, it owes such life as it has to foreign money and foreign troops.


Copyright © 2000 by The Atlantic Monthly Company. All rights reserved.
The Atlantic Monthly; April 2000; After the Wars - 00.04; Volume 285, No. 4; page 79.