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Atlantic Unbound
The Atlantic's online journal
INTERVIEWS
Alice Fulton: Justice + Beauty = Sublime
The acclaimed poet Alice Fulton talks about Cascade Experiment, her new collection of poems, and why art must aim to be "fair"—in both senses of the word.

FLASHBACKS
Do We Really Need a Vice President?
Is the office of the Vice President merely "a resting place for mediocrities"? Arthur Schlesinger, Gerald Ford, Hubert Humphrey, and others weigh in.

SAGE, INK
Admit Two
The Swan
Cartoons by Sage Stossel.

INTERVIEWS
Franklin Foer: Soccerworld
Franklin Foer, the author of How Soccer Explains the World, on what soccer has to tell us about globalization, identity politics, and the future of baseball.

INTERVIEWS
Trevor Corson: Livin' la Vida Lobster
Trevor Corson, the author of The Secret Life of Lobsters, talks about fishing for lobsters, and the quirks of our favorite crustacean.

INTERVIEWS
Alain de Botton: The Status-tician
Why do the successes of our peers drive us crazy? Alain de Botton, the author of Status Anxiety, explains.

POLITICS & PROSE
Bush's Monica Moment
Clinton's affair with Monica called his character into question; Bush's true colors emerged on 9/11. By Jack Beatty.

INTERVIEWS
Edwidge Danticat: Grappling With Haiti's Beasts
Edwidge Danticat talks about reconnecting with her homeland—and coming to terms with its legacy of violence—through fiction.

FLASHBACKS
The Paradoxical Case of Tony Blair
Articles from 1996 to the present chronicle Tony Blair's career, from his meteoric ascent to his fall from favor.

INTERVIEWS
Robert D. Kaplan: In the Line of Fire
Journalist Robert D. Kaplan joined U.S. Marines as they stormed Fallujah, and returned to share his impressions.

INTERVIEWS
Robert Olen Butler: Faraway Voices
Pulitzer Prize-winning author Robert Olen Butler talks about tapping into different points of view and writing "from the place where you dream."

INTERVIEWS
David Bezmozgis: From Toronto With Love
David Bezmozgis on his sudden literary success and his first collection of stories, a wry and intimate portrait of a Russian-Jewish immigrant family.

INTERVIEWS
Niall Ferguson: Our Imperial Imperative
Niall Ferguson, the author of Colossus, laments the emasculation of American imperialism.

INTERVIEWS
Brian Greene: The Universe Made Simple
Brian Greene, the author of The Fabric of the Cosmos, on opening readers' eyes to the hidden forces that govern our world.

POLITICS & PROSE
History's Fools
In the wake of Iraq, the term "neo-conservative" may come to mean "dangerous innocence about world realities." By Jack Beatty.

FLASHBACKS
Looking Back at Brown v. Board of Education
Articles from 1954 and 1960 offer a look at how the Supreme Court's landmark desegregation ruling was initially received.

INTERVIEWS
Where Did He Go Wrong?: An Interview with Geoffrey Wheatcroft
Geoffrey Wheatcroft, the author of "The Tragedy of Tony Blair," examines the British Prime Minister's dramatic downward spiral.

INTERVIEWS
Dennis Lehane: Hookers, Guns, and Money
Dennis Lehane talks about Mystic River, Hollywood, and "fiction of mortal event."

INTERVIEWS
Bernard Lewis: Islam's Interpreter
Bernard Lewis talks about his seventy years spent studying the Middle East—and his thoughts on the region's future.

FLASHBACKS
Transcripts of a Troubled Mind
The short, sad life of Breece D'J Pancake, whose writings in The Atlantic brought to life the dissipated Appalachian world in which he was raised.

INTERVIEWS
Jonathan Rauch: A Modest (Marriage) Proposal
Jonathan Rauch talks about his quest to establish a middle ground in the gay-marriage debate.

POLITICS & PROSE
The Party of the People
The Republicans, unlike the Democrats, have delivered what their constituency wants. By Jack Beatty.

INTERVIEWS
Scott Stossel: The Call to Service
Scott Stossel, the author of Sarge, talks about the life and legacy of Sargent Shriver.

INTERVIEWS
Paul Maslin: Inside the Dean Campaign
Howard Dean's political pollster talks about the campaign's extraordinary rise and crashing fall.

FLASHBACKS
Faster, Stronger, Smarter...
Articles from 1912 to the present consider how far we should go to refine humanity through science.

INTERVIEWS
The Scourge of Agriculture: An Interview with Richard Manning
Richard Manning argues that looking back to what "nature has already imagined" could be the solution for a world ravaged by farming.

INTERVIEWS
Paul Theroux: The Perpetual Stranger
Paul Theroux talks about writing and traveling—and the liberation that both provide.

INTERVIEWS
Benny Morris: The Lonely Historian
Benny Morris discusses the new version of his famously controversial book, The Birth of the Palestinian Refugee Problem, which has left him alienated from both the left and the right.

POLITICS & PROSE
The Faith-Based Presidency
You can question Bush's veracity, his grip on reality, and the rationality of his policies, but not his faith. By Jack Beatty.

FLASHBACKS
Drama in the Court!
Articles from 1898 to the present consider what's at stake when high-profile court cases play out in the public eye.

INTERVIEWS
Jeffrey Rosen: The Softer Side of Ashcroft
Jeffrey Rosen argues that it is not social conservatism but a quest for popular approval that drives John Ashcroft's public life.

INTERVIEWS
The Thoughtful Soldier: An Interview With Douglas Brinkley
Douglas Brinkley, the author of Tour of Duty, on John Kerry's conflicted but heroic service in Vietnam.

For more from The Atlantic's online journal, see the Atlantic Unbound archive.
For the Record
"Nothing is worse than a poem that's secondhand and cynical, a poem that was written to get into a certain magazine or for a certain market. But if one really engages with a subject, something quirky and strange—good strange—will come of it." —Alice Fulton, in "Justice + Beauty = Sublime," an Atlantic Unbound interview.
War in Iraq
Atlantic articles in the news
Blind Into Baghdad
by James Fallows
The U.S. occupation of Iraq is a debacle because a vast amount of expert planning was willfully ignored.

Spies, Lies, and Weapons: What Went Wrong
by Kenneth M. Pollack
A detailed account of why we were so far off in our estimates of Saddam's weapons programs.

The Fifty-first State?
by James Fallows
Are we ready for a long-term relationship with Iraq?
E-mail Newsletters
Weekly and monthly
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Post & Riposte
The Atlantic Forum
When George Meets John
How will Bush and Kerry fare upon being pitted against one another in the upcoming campaign debates?

Sontag vs. Kael
How do Pauline Kael and Susan Sontag compare?

Sharpton's Quixotic Campaign
Is "leader of black America" still a necessary position in contemporary politics?

See the complete forum index.
U.N. Notebook
A column from U.N. Wire
Blunt Approach Needed to Tackle India's AIDS Crisis
"India, with 5.1 million people living with HIV/AIDS, is poised to overtake South Africa as the nation with the most cases in the world." By Barbara Crossette.
D.C. Dispatch
from National Journal
Media: Swing Party!
The swing vote isn't just a story, it's a fun house, a riddle, with no penalty for guessing wrong. By William Powers.

Social Studies: For Kerry, It's Not The Economy, Stupid. It's Strength.
John F. Kerry should take a page from John F. Kennedy's 1960 playbook and run as a hard-liner on national security issues. By Jonathan Rauch.

Political Pulse: Maybe It's Not the Economy
A bad economy doomed former President Bush. A good economy may not save this President Bush. By William Schneider.

Legal Affairs: How Bush's Overreaching Hurts the War Against Terrorism
The Supreme Court rulings on enemy combatants and the Bush administration's handling of torture guidelines represent a failure of leadership by the president. By Stuart Taylor Jr.

Wealth of Nations: Why the Fed Has to Be Careful in Raising Rates
The Fed needs no reminding that Japan's financial authorities pushed their economy back into recession in 2000 by tightening too soon. By Clive Crook.

Media: The Church of Best-Sellers
Media people are the high priests of secular culture, encouraging people to worship what sells. By William Powers.

Legal Affairs: Nuclear Terror: Has Bush Made Matters Worse?
Are we better off than we were four years ago, when it comes to reducing the threat of nuclear terrorism? The Bush administration's record is far from encouraging. By Stuart Taylor Jr.

Political Pulse: Kerry's Deviation
Observant and dissenting Catholics disagree on the proper role of the church in politics. By William Schneider.

More from National Journal.
The Magazine
July/August 2004 | Digital Edition
Dumb and Dumber
Why are campaign commercials so lousy? By Joshua Green.

Plus: P. J. O'Rourke on conservative talk shows; David Thomson reviews Sontag & Kael; and more, in the July/August issue.

Subscribe to The Atlantic today and save $25.

Browse back issues that have appeared on the Web.
The Archive
More than a century of The Atlantic
From the Civil War to the war on terrorism, search more than a century of The Atlantic—and retrieve up to five articles for only $5.95. Click here to begin.
The Archive
Flashbacks
Highlights from The Atlantic's history
In the Footsteps of a Knight of the Round Table
This month King Arthur comes to the big screen. In 1994 Cullen Murphy journeyed to "the heartland of Arthurian legends."

90 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Meditations on Votes for Women (July 1914)
"Multitudes of educated women are in influential positions, moulding public sentiment and directing large institutions. All the functions of citizenship they actually exercise except that of voting." In 1914 Samuel McChord Crothers advocated suffrage for women.

Marlon Brando: An American Hero
"He was our angry young man—the delinquent, the tough, the rebel—who stood at the center of our common experience. " In 1966 Pauline Kael lauded Brando as too good for what Hollywood had become.

15 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
A Toxic Ghost Town (July 1989)
"Today Love Canal is a forty-acre mound of clay ringed by warning signs, a high chain-link fence, and a drainage trench." In 1989 Michael H. Brown revisited the site of one of America's most notorious toxic waste crises.

145 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Stereoscope and the Stereograph (June 1859)
"Form is henceforth divorced from matter. Give us a few negatives of a thing, and that is all we want of it." In 1859 Oliver Wendell Holmes famously proclaimed that our relationship to art and the world around us had been forever altered.

45 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
American Planes: The Lessons of History (June 1959)
"Some clear and not too pleasant lessons are to be learned from a reflective perusal of the more than half century in which we have developed our air travel." In 1959 an aircraft engineer criticized the slow pace of progress in aviation.

25 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Nuclear Age (June 1979)
"Nobody wanted to pray, but each of us blessed the bomb without guilt, and Sarah chanted, 'Fission, fusion, critical mass.'" A short story by Tim O'Brien.

Reagan in Retrospect
"'Reagan ... restored a belief that an extraordinary, but mortal, person can give leadership and a sense of direction to the American national government.'" In 1987 William Schneider assessed Ronald Reagan's impact on American politics.

D-Day Remembered
"Follow along with Able and Baker companies. Their story is lifted from my fading Normandy notebook, which covers the landing of every Omaha company." In 1960 a combat historian recalled the horrors of Omaha beach on D-Day.

35 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Right of Abortion (June 1969)
"We continue to maintain strict antiabortion laws on the books, denying freedom of choice to women and physicians and compelling the 'unwilling to bear the unwanted.'" In 1969 a Manhattan lawyer argued in favor of abortion rights.

The Day After Tomorrow?
"We could go back to ice-age temperatures within a decade, triggered by our current global-warming trend." In 1998 William H. Calvin argued that global warming could lead to an abrupt cooling that would threaten human survival.

Perennial Oil Worries
"Unless we exercise foresight, events will thrust us into a crisis that will lead to a substantial erosion of our domestic oil supply and give Middle Eastern suppliers dangerous leverage over our transportation system." In 1972 Stewart Udall issued a prescient warning.

5 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Napoleon in Rags (May 1999)
"There was no rock style of the late sixties or early seventies that Dylan didn't touch in some way, no matter how alien its aesthetic might have seemed to him." In 1999, Francis Davis considered Bob Dylan's influence on today's music scene.

2004 RUTH LILLY POETRY PRIZE
This week Kay Ryan was awarded the prestigious Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize. Read and listen to four of Ryan's poems that originally appeared in The Atlantic: "Hailstorm" (2003), "Among English Verbs" (1998), "This Life" (1993), and "Emptiness" (1993).

The Gay-Marriage Experiment
"The only way to find out what would happen if same-sex couples got marriage certificates is to let some of us do it." In the April, 2004, Atlantic Jonathan Rauch argued in favor of letting each state decide the gay-marriage question for itself.

100 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Diplomatic Contest for the Mississippi Valley (May 1904)
"The Louisiana Purchase was the turning-point in the events that fixed our position as the arbiter of the New World." In 1904, Frederick J. Turner traced the early years of America's westward expansion.

The Murder of Emmett Till
The Justice Department has announced that it will reopen the investigation into Emmett Till's murder, fifty years ago. In 2001, The Atlantic ran Studs Terkel's interview with Mamie Mobley, Till's mother, in which she talked about seeing her son's body for the first time.

40 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Mad Strangler of Boston (May 1964)
"But the victims... submitted to murder as meekly as though they had been hypnotized and told the fatal stocking being placed around their necks was actually a pearl necklace." Perry Mason creator Erle Stanley Gardner on the case of the Boston Strangler.

120 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Red Sunsets (April 1884)
"When this volcanic dust ceases to glorify our skies at dawn and eve, we shall part with the most remarkable and picturesque accident to the earth's physical life that has been known." An 1884 article linked "strange heavens" worldwide to the Krakatoa eruption.

15 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
Afghanistan Post Mortem (April 1989)
"Afghanistan may evoke the military past, but its importance is as a preview of the battleground of the future." From 1989, Robert Kaplan's unsettling lessons from ten years of Soviet-Afghan war.

45 YEARS AGO IN THE ATLANTIC
The Sacrificial Egg (April 1959)
"Someone oppressed by misfortune had brought the offering to the crossroads in the dusk. And he had stepped on it and taken the sufferer's ill luck to himself." From 1959, Chinua Achebe's first short story published in the United States.

More Flashbacks from The Atlantic.

Browse back issues and highlights from The Atlantic's history.