Notes
First thoughts, running arguments, stories in progress
Live-Blogging the 2016 Golden Globes
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A collection of notes on Sunday’s awards ceremony.

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NBC

After a DUI, domestic-abuse scandal, and a few well-publicized expressions of anti-semitism and racism and sexism, can a movie star rehabilitate his career? That’s been the common question around Mel Gibson for at least a half-decade. In 2010, Ricky Gervais blasted him on stage at the Golden Globes, setting up tonight’s testy exchange between the two men. The moment was bound to be weird, but whether it was supposed to be this weird isn’t clear. It seemed genuinely acrimonious to me on first viewing, but maybe the entire episode was choreographed in hopes of giving Gibson his final punishment.

“A few years ago on this show I made a joke about Mel Gibson getting a bit drunk and saying a few unsavory things,” Gervais began. “We’ve all done it. I wasn’t judging him, but now I find myself in the awkward position of having to introduce him again. Listen I’m sure it’s embarrassing for both of us, and I blame NBC for this terrible situation. And Mel blames... Well, we know who Mel blames.”

NBC via eonline

In December, when the 2016 Golden Globes nominees were announced, the awards’ official Twitter account made an extremely unfortunate mistake. “.@HereIsGina is kicking off the @goldenglobes nominations announcements,” the account tweeted, chirpily, sharing a photo of Globes presenters Chloe Grace Moretz, Angela Bassett, Dennis Quaid … and America Ferrera. The America Ferrera who starred in Ugly Betty, who currently stars in Superstore, and who is very much not @HereIsGina’s Gina Rodriguez.

Reuters

Remember when Steve Harvey got the winner of Miss World wrong a few weeks back? Jamie Foxx did! He did a whole little comedy bit for his Best Original Score presentation announcing Straight Outta Compton as the winner (it wasn’t even nominated). But Foxx’s clunker was quickly upstaged by the rambling Quentin Tarantino, accepting for The Hateful Eight’s composer Ennio Morricone.

Reuters

The 2016 Golden Globes kicked off with the return of Ricky Gervais’s self-branded “edgy” comedy, which consisted mostly of warmed-over jokes about Caitlyn Jenner and Transparent and very little of the scorching Hollywood satire he promised. His return to the Globes stage comes after three years of Tina Fey and Amy Poehler in the hosting gig, and it’s quite the rude awakening after their spectacular run.

Gervais prides himself on telling it like it is, but many of his targets aren’t even in the room—so far Spotlight’s been the excuse for a joke about Roman Polanski being a child molester, and a requisite reference to Sean Penn’s interview with El Chapo preceded five minutes of general rambling about the pointlessness of awards in general.

The best thing to say about Gervais so far is his monologue was pretty short—and that it produced a lot of unimpressed looks from actors in the audience, who the producers kept gleefully cutting to. Jeffrey Tambor’s nonplussed gaze said it all, although producer Harvey Weinstein seemed amused when Gervais jokingly called him out for outright buying awards for his clients. Just a few minutes later, Andy Samberg presented Best Actress in a TV Comedy, did a one-minute riff predicting some wild events to come, and made a solid case for why he should take the gig from Gervais next year.

The night’s inevitable Sean Penn joke was dispensed with quickly. Kicking off a monologue even more performatively mean than the ones he gave in his previous years as host of the Golden Globes, Ricky Gervais said that after he left the stage he’d go somewhere so remote that even El Chapo’s new Hollywood spokesman couldn’t find him.

The winners in the order they were announced:

Supporting actress, film: Kate Winslet, Steve Jobs

Supporting actress, TV: Maura Tierney, The Affair

Actress, TV comedy Rachel Bloom, Crazy Ex-Girlfriend

TV comedy: Mozart in the Jungle

TV limited series or film: Wolf Hall

Actor, TV limited series or film: Oscar Isaac, Show Me a Hero

Supporting actor, TV: Christian Slater, Mr. Robot

Cecil B. Demille Award: Denzel Washington

Original score, film: Ennio Morricone, The Hateful 8

Actor, TV drama: Jon Hamm, Mad Men

Actor, film comedy: Matt Damon, The Martian

Animated film: Inside Out

Supporting actor, film: Sylvester Stallone, Creed

Screenplay, film: Aaron Sorkin, Steve Jobs

Actor, comedy: Gael García Bernal, Mozart in the Jungle

Foreign-language film: Son of Saul, Hungary

Actress, TV limited series or movie: Lady Gaga, American Horror Story: Hotel

Original song, film: “Writing’s on the Wall,” Sam Smith and Jimmy Napes, Spectre

TV drama: Mr. Robot

Director, film: Alejandro Iñárritu, The Revenant

Actress, TV drama: Taraji P. Henson, Empire

Actress, film comedy: Jennifer Lawrence, Joy

Film comedy: The Martian

Actress, film drama: Brie Larson, Room

Actor, film drama: Leonardo DiCaprio, The Revenant

Film drama: The Revenant

The rest of The Atlantic’s coverage of the ceremony is here.