The revitalization of the beleaguered city of Fresno, a history of unisex fashion through the 20th century, why being short may contribute to increased health and longevity, and more...

This Week on TheAtlantic.com

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

The Myth of Police Reform

The real problem is the belief that all our social problems can be solved with force.

Ta-Nehisi Coates

Economists Still Think Economics Is the Best

Despite failing to foresee the largest financial crisis since the Great Depression, leaders in the field still fail to look for wisdom beyond its bounds.

Moisés Naím

The Eternal Return of BuzzFeed

What the online juggernaut can learn from Time, USA Today, and MTV

Adrienne LaFrance and Robinson Meyer

A Brief History of Unisex Fashion

Gender-neutral clothing is back in vogue, but the craze in many ways has mirrored broader social changes throughout the 20th century.

Kimberly Chrisman-Campbell

The Virtue of Being Short

Taller does not mean healthier. It's more likely the opposite.

James Hamblin

What Undocumented Students Bring to the Classroom

Public discourse shouldn't focus on what immigrants "take" from America but rather on how they enhance the learning experiences for all the country's children.

Andrew Simmons

How Christians Turned Against Gay Conversion Therapy

Obama's call to ban the practice reflects a tectonic shift within the community that once championed it.

Jonathan Merritt

3 Ways of Thinking About Fresno (and Why You Should Care)

A beleaguered city shows the path toward revival.

James Fallows

The Vietnam War, as Seen by the Victors

How the North Vietnamese remember the conflict 40 years after the fall of Saigon

Elisabeth Rosen

Video: A Mesmerizing Norwegian Time-Lapse

A tour of Norway's western coast, filmed over the course of three years

Chris Heller

Photo: And Then There Was One

Across China, some home owners have stood their ground and resisted demolition.

Clones on the Court

A Supreme Court that once included former senators and governors is populated today by judges with identical résumés. Here's why that's a mistake.

Akhil Reed Amar