NASA Revisits Satellite Images of Hurricane Katrina

By Kasia Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg

Satellite imaging from August, 2005, reveals the size and strength of Hurricane Katrina in this short video put together by NASA in 2010. Today in After Hurricane Katrina, Years of Post-Traumatic Stress, Susannah Breslin remembers:

The day before Katrina made landfall, I fled the city, ending up in Lafayette, Louisiana, with a dozen other evacuees. Together, we looked on in paralyzed horror as the city flooded on the TV screen. The Louisiana Superdome became a refugee camp, New Orleans residents waited on rooftops bearing signs asking to be saved, and the dead lay uncollected in the streets. The storm's damage tally would exceed an estimated $80 billion. When it became clear none of us would be going home anytime soon, we left one by one, heading to points across the country.

When I did return to New Orleans, the city was ravaged, its great oak trees broken, its buildings crumbling, a refrigerator stranded on a dark sidewalk like a ghost. My neighborhood was deserted.

For more videos from NASA, visit the Internet Archive.

This article available online at:

http://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2011/08/nasa-revisits-satellite-images-of-hurricane-katrina/244300/