Watch (and Participate) Live: An Interview With George Packer

A finalist for the National Book Award, Packer joins The Atlantic's Jeffrey Goldberg in a video chat about The Unwinding, his 2013 work on the collapse of a superpower.
Farrar, Straus and Giroux / Guillermo Riveros/

George Packer's The Unwinding: An Inner History of the New America portrays a superpower in danger of coming apart at the seams, its elites no longer elite, its institutions no longer working, its ordinary people left to improvise their own schemes for success and salvation. In addition to being selected as a National Book Award finalist, The Unwinding was named to Publishers Weekly's list of the best nonfiction books of 2013 and iTunes' "Ten Books You Must Read This Summer."

On Thursday, Nov. 14 at 9 p.m. EST, The Atlantic's Jeffrey Goldberg will lead an online discussion with Packer about The Unwinding, where audience members will have the opportunity to ask Packer and Goldberg questions via live video or text. Click "RSVP" to receive an email reminder about the event, or simply return to this page at 9 p.m. EST on Thursday to enter the conversation.

George Packer has published nine books and is a staff writer for The New Yorker, where he writes about U.S. foreign policy. Jeffrey Goldberg is a national correspondent for The Atlantic and a recipient of the National Magazine Award for Reporting.


 
Presented by

Ashley Fetters is a former associate editor at The Atlantic.

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