The Case Against Striking Syria, Jack London’s Beef With Capitalism: The New Atlantic Weekly

Also in this issue: A witch-hunt in Saudi Arabia, when to reveal state secrets, battling Yosemite’s blaze, and more

Your weekend awaits and so does the latest issue of The Atlantic Weekly, our new digital magazine available on iPhone and iPad. This week, among other things, we ponder…

  • What could possibly go wrong with attacking Syria
  • The suspected slapdashery of the prominent leakers of our age—your Edward Snowdens and Bradley Mannings—who appear to lack coherent policy aims when they indiscriminately share troves of secrets
  • Why Jack London’s pro-labor politics were a little too much for the editors of The Atlantic
  • Why Saudi Arabia has gotten convinced that a scourge of sorcerers practicing black magic is rising up across the land (an Anti-Witchcraft Unit has been inaugurated to sort out the problem)
  • The extent to which a family’s income now determines how well their children will do in school
  • Whether future generations will know Microsoft as merely a maker of video game consoles

That and, honestly, much more in the Weekly—ready for download now!

The Atlantic Weekly is available in the iTunes store now.

Presented by

Geoffrey Gagnon is a senior editor at The Atlantic.

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