George Will's Abominable Foray into College Football

The results of which are sadly predictable:


With two extravagant entertainments under way, it is instructive to note the connection between the presidential election and the college football season: Barack Obama represents progressivism, a doctrine whose many blemishes on American life include universities as football factories, which progressivism helped to create.

No it's not instructive at all, and George Will knows it isn't.

This is what I meant the other day in pointing out how power allows for amorality and torpor. An opening graff like this would be laughed at in any decent Freshman Composition class. But for George Will it is a remuneration and it does not injure his ability to continue collecting more renumeration. On the contrary, Will enjoys a reputation for intelligence and erudition, a "serious conservative."

That should write something that evinces such contempt for the intelligence of his readers, his editors, and his newspaper means nothing. He has power and thus endures. The standards for first-year student in J-School, are not the standards for a practicing journalist of alleged repute.  The upshot is that laziness is not a sin, but a kind of luxury, that writing must only be taken seriously by those who can't afford the outright purchase of sloth.

It's tempting to laugh at this. But it's very wrong. Will has takes a serious issue (one the Atlantic has written about in great depth, mind you) and renders it as hackery. More later. I should not write angry. I wish he'd go back to the climate change beat. 
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Ta-Nehisi Coates is a national correspondent at The Atlantic, where he writes about culture, politics, and social issues. He is the author of the memoir The Beautiful Struggle.

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