Surviving the Titanic

One hundred years ago this week, the Titanic set sail for its doomed voyage. 

When the ocean liner sank on April 14, 1912, it very quickly achieved a mythical status. The Titanic itself was a larger-than-life ship and its passengers included some of the wealthiest Americans, including John Jacob Astor and Isador Strauss. Papers like The New York Times covered the event incessantly and from all angles. From the day of the crash to the end of that month, the Times published more than 100 pages of narrative on the disaster. The stories in the pages of the Times echo to this day, in works like A Night to Remember and James Cameron's Titanic.  

Below are images of some of the survivors who kept that narrative alive with them.
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Brian Resnick is a staff correspondent at National Journal and a former producer of The Atlantic's National channel.

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