What America Looked Like: Titanic Survivors

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It's hard to look at the images of the wreck of the Costa Concordia, and not think of the most famous shipwreck of them all, the Titanic. 


The story does not bear repeating, but when the ocean liner sank on April 14, 1912, it very quickly achieved a mythical status. The Titanic itself was a larger-than-life ship and it's passengers included some of the wealthiest Americans, including John Jacob Astor and Isador Strauss. Papers like The New York Times covered the event incessantly and from all angles. From the day of the crash to the end of that month, the Times published more than 100 pages of narrative on the disaster. 

Below are images of some of the survivors who kept that narrative alive with them.


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Brian Resnick is a staff correspondent at National Journal and a former producer of The Atlantic's National channel.

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