The Home of Thomas Edison's Son, a Former New Jersey Governor

Location: West Orange, New Jersey

Price: $599,000

The neighborhood of Llewellyn Park was the country's first planned community, so it's only fitting that a descendant of legendary inventor and industrialist Thomas Edison would have made his home here. Charles Edison, Thomas Edison's son, purchased "The Patches," as he dubbed this Victorian house, in the summer of 1920. Charles later went on to become the governor of New Jersey and built a new large mansion in West Orange, but held on to his first home until 1950. In 1951, Edison moved into NYC's swanky Waldorf-Astoria Hotel where he lived until his death 17 years later. The house has not been substantially modified since Edison departed and features six bedrooms, five baths, four fireplaces, and a 1.53-acre lot. Currently listed for $599,000, it is apparently in need of substantial TLC, but at least that means the current owners haven't ruined the good bones. In fact, they still have a blueprint from Edison's alterations to the house.

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