Regional Modern: Oregon Homes Respond to the Landscape

Editor's Note: The Regional Modern series focuses on the regional differences in modern and contemporary architecture, countering the impression that "modern" means universal and placeless. In photo tours from Manhattan to Malibu, see how today's innovative homes are influenced by climate, environment, and culture, becoming both private oases and part of a larger landscape we all share.

It may be easy to argue that what drives architecture and design in Seattle, Washington, is the same in Portland and other areas in Oregon to the south, creating a general Pacific Northwest modern style. There may be some truth in that in regards to climate and landscape, but each metropolitan area is unique in cultural and other aspects. This leads to idiosyncratic if similar modernisms in each region.

Portland is known among those interested in architecture and urbanism for its dense core and varied transportation, a result of strong top-down planning that is forward thinking in its sustainable goals. Here, the greenfield suburbanization of farmland that is the favored practice around the United States is eschewed in favor of preserving a greenbelt around the city. While this general plan has led to some quality interventions in the urban core, the houses that follow clearly fall outside that area -- and into other parts of Oregon -- and are indicative of design that responds to landscapes rather than city life.


More Regional Modern entriesAustin | Boston | New York City | Metro New York | Chicago

Presented by

John Hill is a New York City-based architecture writer for Houzz.com.

Never Tell People How Old They Look

Age discrimination affects us all. Who cares about youth? James Hamblin turns to his colleague Jeffrey Goldberg for advice.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Never Tell People How Old They Look

Age discrimination affects us all. James Hamblin turns to a colleague for advice.

Video

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

Video

Pittsburgh: 'Better Than You Thought'

How Steel City became a bikeable, walkable paradise

Video

A Four-Dimensional Tour of Boston

In this groundbreaking video, time moves at multiple speeds within a single frame.

Video

Who Made Pop Music So Repetitive? You Did.

If pop music is too homogenous, that's because listeners want it that way.

More in National

Just In