Regional Modern: From Monterey Bay to California's Wine Country

Editor's Note: The Regional Modern series focuses on the regional differences in modern and contemporary architecture, countering the impression that "modern" means universal and placeless. In photo tours from Manhattan to Malibu, see how today's innovative homes are influenced by climate, environment, and culture, becoming both private oases and part of a larger landscape we all share.

Our grand tour of modernist architecture in the United States continues down the West Coast into Northern California. The state as a whole has been the home to some of the best and most influential residential architecture since the middle of last century. But because the climate varies greatly from north to south, its residential architecture varies as well.

Northern California is basically the top half of the state, encompassing San Francisco and the state capital Sacramento. The landscape is diverse and dramatic, marked by mountains, forests, lakes, and, of course, the Pacific Ocean. One could argue that all residential architecture should be designed to frame the best aspects of its surroundings. In the case of Northern California, that beauty is especially strong and certainly worthy of incorporating into a house's design.


More Regional Modern entriesAustin | Boston | New York City | Metro New York | Chicago

Presented by

John Hill is a New York City-based architecture writer for Houzz.com.

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

Video

Pittsburgh: 'Better Than You Thought'

How Steel City became a bikeable, walkable paradise

Video

A Four-Dimensional Tour of Boston

In this groundbreaking video, time moves at multiple speeds within a single frame.

Video

Who Made Pop Music So Repetitive? You Did.

If pop music is too homogenous, that's because listeners want it that way.

More in National

Just In