Mississippi's Most Expensive Mansion Once Slept Ulysses Grant

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Location: Holly Springs, Mississippi

Price: $15,000,000

This extravagant Southern estate, dubbed Walter Place, was built in 1830 for railroad baron Harvey Washington Walter. The chief of the Mississippi Central Railroad, Walter expressly commissioned this lavish brick manse as the "grandest home in Holly Springs." When Union General Ulysses Grant rolled into town, he housed his wife and children in Walter's luxe digs. After the war, though, things turned bad, as it was used to quarantine patients during the Yellow Fever epidemic of 1878. In fact, Walter and three of his sons died from the disease within days of one another. Almost a century later, the house was purchased by a pair of history buffs and restored to glory. A glory that's hoping to justify a $15,000,000 price tag. The 14,000-square-foot compound features 12 bedrooms, 12 baths, 15 acres, and a hundred-year-old botanical garden.

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