Oracle's Larry Ellison Sells Off 2 Equestrian Estates in California

Location: Woodside, California

Price: $19,000,000

The software billionaire Larry Ellison is best known in real estate circles for his insatiable appetite for high-end properties. According to the Real Estalker, the Oracle chief has spent more than $100,000,000 acquiring lakefront property on Lake Tahoe, another $200,000,000 on his 23-acre Japanese-style home in Woodside, California, and countless millions on additional estates around the world. With some $33,000,000,000 at his disposal, Ellison could probably carry on like this for a lifetime, but, for some reason, has decided to divest himself of a pair of equestrian estates located not far from his main house in Woodside. Purchased in November 2005 for $23,000,000, the properties are listed together for $19,000,000. That Ellison didn't even attempt to recoup his investment demonstrates how casually he can depart with $4,000,000, especially considering the sums he must have plunged into the estate to meet his standards. The buyer of the 6.88-acre horse-friendly property will be getting a columned main house, spacious guest house, a grotto-like swimming pool, and two barns for the horses.

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