The Mansion of Early Lindbergh Benefactor Albert Lambert

Location: St. Louis, Missouri

Price: $1,899,000

Olympic golfer, Listerine heir, and aviation enthusiast Albert Bond Lambert lived in this house while funding the airborne dalliances of a certain Charles Lindbergh. The mouthwash mogul threw thousands of dollars behind the young mail pilot's effort to become the first man to fly across the Atlantic non-stop, hence the plane's moniker: "The Spirit of St. Louis." Lambert's largess extended to his private residence, as well, a 12,000-square-foot mansion in the tony, if none-too-creatively titled, Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis. That mansion boasts the original 21 rooms and historic woodwork, but has been updated for the 21st century with a Lutron lighting package, a $200,000 security system, a new foundation, and a media room. That extensive renovation apparently cost the owners $3 million, a sum they're certain not to recover with the $1.9 million asking price.

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