A Grand Philadelphia Estate Built at the Height of the Great Depression

Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Price: $2,950,000

The stone masons, woodworkers, and carpenters who were contracted to produce this colossal stone estate for Philadelphia industrialist Morris Leeds must have jumped at the chance to work during the lowest lows of the Great Depression, as this house was constructed between 1931 and 1935. Leeds, an engineer who specialized in electrical controls, built the house as he was entering his sixties and looks to have plunged a good portion of his considerable wealth into the undertaking. Renovated in 2008 and 2009 -- ironically coinciding with the most recent recession -- the 10,000-square-foot mansion retains much of its period detail and, with eight beds and nine baths for under $3,000,000, this is looking like a deal compared to the crudely renovated Main Line mansions we looked at last week.

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Curbed.com offers its daily witty, urbane take on architecture, real estate, and neighborhood news in nearly a dozen cities across the U.S., and on its flagship Curbed National site, where House of the Day, written by Rob Bear, appears.

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