Random Question on Urban Planning

I think I've asked this in comments before, but I want to open it up a bit. Kenneth Jackson's Crabgrass Frontier is the best broad/survey history I've ever read of the formation of American cites and suburbs. Unlike a lot of survey's, Jackson actually takes positions and makes arguments. I've read a lot of books on cities since, but none that take a macro level look at the history.


But Crabgrass was published in almost thirty years ago. There have to have been advances since then. Does anyone know of a more up to date volume that's taken up Jackson's work with the same sort of breadth and depth? I don't polemics or even micro-histories of neighborhoods or cities, but more national works. The more local histories have their place -- Thomas Sugrue's work is king--but I'm asking about something else.

Thoughts?
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Ta-Nehisi Coates is a national correspondent at The Atlantic, where he writes about culture, politics, and social issues. He is the author of the memoir The Beautiful Struggle.

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