AWOL Soldier with 'Islamic Extremist Literature' Arrested Near Ft. Hood (UPDATED)

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From The Times:

Military officials at Fort Hood said in a statement on Thursday that the suspect, Naser Abdo, is not based there.

"At this time, there has been no incident at Fort Hood," said the statement, which was posted on the base's Facebook page. "We continue our diligence in keeping our force protection at appropriate levels."

The statement said Mr. Abdo had been arrested by police in the town of Killeen, to the south of the base.

The Killeen Daily Herald, citing local authorities, said Mr. Abdo was absent without leave from a different army facility, Fort Campbell in Kentucky, but that there were allegations he was planning an attack on Fort Hood.

Citing an unnamed law-enforcement official, CNN reported that "Islamic extremist literature" and a .40 caliber pistol had been found in Mr. Abdo's backpack and that in his hotel room he had a number of suspicious items: more than one battery-operated clock, Christmas lights, sugar, shrapnel, a pressure cooker, shotgun shells and six pounds of smokeless powder. The network did not elaborate on the type of powder and it was unclear if those items alone could be used to manufacture an explosive device.

UPDATE: Apparently this guy was not only an Islamist extremist but an child pornographer..
UPDATE: Just be be clear, an alleged child pornography collector, and an alleged extremist.

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Jeffrey Goldberg is a national correspondent for The Atlantic and a recipient of the National Magazine Award for Reporting. He is the author of Prisoners: A Story of Friendship and Terror. More

Before joining The Atlantic in 2007, Goldberg was a Middle East correspondent, and the Washington correspondent, for The New Yorker. He was previouslly a correspondent for The New York Times Magazine and New York magazine. He has also written for the Jewish Daily Forward and was a columnist for The Jerusalem Post.

Goldberg's book Prisoners was hailed as one of the best books of 2006 by the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Slate, The Progressive, Washingtonian magazine, and Playboy. He received the 2003 National Magazine Award for Reporting for his coverage of Islamic terrorism and the 2005 Anti-Defamation League Daniel Pearl Prize. He is also the winner of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists prize for best international investigative journalist; the Overseas Press Club award for best human-rights reporting; and the Abraham Cahan Prize in Journalism.

In 2001, Goldberg was appointed the Syrkin Fellow in Letters of the Jerusalem Foundation, and in 2002 he became a public-policy scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C.

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