One More Thought

There are some hard feelings over the fact that the two officers involved were not convicted of rape. That's understandable. Still I think it's worth noting that the officers were fired. I would not set myself up as someone who hands out consolation prizes. But prosecutions are made on behalf of victims, and on behalf of the citizenry. 


Because of this woman's willingness to testify, and the prosecutor's willingness to bring the case (despite it's problems), two men, who think it's a fine idea to knowingly break the law, no longer hold the power to detain, injure and kill on behalf of the state.

This is a good thing. 

In this instance, it should be remembered that the willingness to charge, and the willingness to testify, made it possible. Perhaps this is not my right, but as the father of a boy going into his teenage years, I am grateful.
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Ta-Nehisi Coates is a national correspondent at The Atlantic, where he writes about culture, politics, and social issues. He is the author of the memoir The Beautiful Struggle.

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