Climate Change Scientists Face Inconvenient Truths

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Two different climate change scientists at opposite ends of the political spectrum have backtracked on their positions in the last couple of days, indicating that Al Gore's method of simultaneously scaring and inspiring everybody with graphs, while effective, might not be sustainable.

On Monday, Edward Wegman, the leading critic of that famous "hockey stick" graph, which shows a sharp uptick in atmospheric carbon dioxide in recent years (and which plays a key role in An Inconvenient Truth), had his paper retracted because much of it was plagiarized. Then today Robert Socolow, who came up with those "wedges" that Gore uses at the end of his film to demonstrate that the problem is surmountable, said he regretted making the solution seem so simple.

Read the full story at The Atlantic Wire.

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