A Different Hawaii: Horses, Plantations, and No Crowds

Images from the tiny, 3,000-person island of Lana'i, which has avoided the touristy atmosphere of its larger cousins

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Horses are still raised on Lana'i, a throwback to the island's days as a plantation. Gary Arndt


The island of Lana'i is one of the smallest and least visited of Hawaii's islands. With only 3,000 permanent residents, it has a very small-town feel and avoids the crowds and tourist trap sensibility of places like Waikiki Beach. It also has some of the most interesting history and scenery of any island in the state. I traveled there in March as a guest of the Lana'i Visitors Bureau.

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Gary Arndt has been traveling and writing around the world since March 2007. He is the author of the popular travel blog Everything Everywhere.

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