State Rights, Cont.

Andrew offers his take:


I don't like my DC taxes going to fund abortions, but it seems to me this should be a debate for the inhabitants of Washington to resolve. I understand the strange historical contingencies that give the residents of the nations capital less representation in Congress than Mosul does in the Iraqi parliament. We are used to federal taxation without any representation, an outrage that seems strangely absent from Tea Party demands. But when a city council cannot even determine where its own funds are spent - because people from far away are playing culture war politics in a budget deal - it really does stick in one's throat.

Basically. 

I'm really curious how this will play out as the District's demographics shift. Put bluntly, as the city grows whiter, and wealthier, will the issue of representation become more urgent to Congress?
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Ta-Nehisi Coates is a national correspondent at The Atlantic, where he writes about culture, politics, and social issues. He is the author of the memoir The Beautiful Struggle.

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