Rhee Changes Her Tune

Sort of. She apologized for her earlier comments on the USA Today story and is now backing a probe:


Former District of Columbia Public Schools chancellor Michelle Rhee says she is "100% supportive" of a broader investigation into standardized test scores in the school district she used to oversee, just days after she dismissed a USA TODAY investigation that showed high rates of corrected answers on student test sheets

In a taped interview to air this weekend on Bloomberg Radio, Rhee, a national figure in education reform, said she "absolutely" supports the decision to investigate high rates of answer changes on standardized tests during her tenure. "If there were isolated instances of this, those should be dealt with properly and we should actually discount those scores in those classrooms," Rhee said in the interview, according to a press release issued by Bloomberg.

She still isn't talking to the reporters who actually did the story. The more I read about Rhee, the more I think a large part of her appeal can be attributed to a frustrated anti-liberalism. I'll have more to say on that later. The thoughts aren't cohering just yet. I just think there's a certain segment of political class that's more interested in seeing her bludgeon unions, then in fixing schools. I say that as someone with my own reservations about municipal unions.

More later.
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Ta-Nehisi Coates is a national correspondent at The Atlantic, where he writes about culture, politics, and social issues. He is the author of the memoir The Beautiful Struggle.

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