Touring Gawker's Headquarters

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Photographer Landon Norderman goes inside the nerve center of the media empire where Nick Denton feeds millions of readers online.



Also see:
Learning to Love the (Shallow, Divisive, Unreliable) New Media by James Fallows
The Atlantic, April 2011

Of course, Denton was omitting good-for-you, public-service-style stories for outrageous effect. In my first "interview" with him for this story, conducted over the course of nearly an hour through an instant-message exchange, he said that a market-minded approach like his would solve the business problem of journalism--but only for "a certain kind of journalism." It worked perfectly, he said, for topics like those his sites covered: gossip, technology, sex talk, and so on. And then, as an aside: "But not the worthy topics. Nobody wants to eat the boring vegetables. Nor does anyone want to pay [via advertising] to encourage people to eat their vegetables."
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