'Many Mental Patients Simply Walk Out'

I mentioned yesterday that I was "sure" it was an "accident" that the NYT juxtaposed two stories on its home page about artificial-heart devices. The first story said that former VP Cheney had gotten one; the second, that too many people were getting them.

Reader Mike Diehl says that I was correct to put the air quotes (OK, electronic quotes) where I did. He writes:

>>Had I seen that, I would not have had a doubt the pairing was intentional. I still have a copy of the New York Times from August 8, 1974 -- one day before Richard Nixon resigned the presidency. On the front page at the bottom is a photo of Nixon, walking from the Executive Office Building to the White House, juxtaposed with an article headlined, "Many Mental Patients Simply Walk Out."

Searching for this page, which I am delighted to have found and am attaching here, I note that quite a number of articles on mental health facilities were published in the paper that summer, several making the front page. Two front-page pieces I found are adjacent to articles on Nixon, but none so juicy as the one I cite above. However, on July 31, a front-page piece by Lawrence van Gelder headlined "Mental Patient Held As Church Arsonist" is sandwiched between two articles on Watergate, one headlined "President Surrenders 11 Tapes to Sirica," the other a reproduction of the text of Impeachment Article III. Coincidence? I think not.

As a graphic designer, I'm aware the opportunities to make such a wry statement with mere page layout are rare, but the New York Times is no stranger to the practice.<<

Here's the bottom of the NYT front page that day. Thanks to Diehl for the nugget. In China they call this sort of internet-borne discovery a "human flesh search engine," as opposed to the algorithmic search engine of Google, Baidu, etc. That is, the internet creates connections, and people then apply their imagination, pattern-recognition, and wit. I'm glad to think that this latest headline was part of a grand tradition.

NixonMental.png


Here's how the whole front page looked:
NYTFrontPage.png

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James Fallows is a national correspondent for The Atlantic and has written for the magazine since the late 1970s. He has reported extensively from outside the United States and once worked as President Carter's chief speechwriter. His latest book is China Airborne. More

James Fallows is based in Washington as a national correspondent for The Atlantic. He has worked for the magazine for nearly 30 years and in that time has also lived in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. He was raised in Redlands, California, received his undergraduate degree in American history and literature from Harvard, and received a graduate degree in economics from Oxford as a Rhodes scholar. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he has spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter, two years as the editor of US News & World Report, and six months as a program designer at Microsoft. He is an instrument-rated private pilot. He is also now the chair in U.S. media at the U.S. Studies Centre at the University of Sydney, in Australia.

Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series Doing Business in China. He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. His recent books Blind Into Baghdad (2006) and Postcards From Tomorrow Square (2009) are based on his writings for The Atlantic. His latest book is China Airborne. He is married to Deborah Fallows, author of the recent book Dreaming in Chinese. They have two married sons.

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