I mentioned yesterday that I was "sure" it was an "accident" that the NYT juxtaposed two stories on its home page about artificial-heart devices. The first story said that former VP Cheney had gotten one; the second, that too many people were getting them.

Reader Mike Diehl says that I was correct to put the air quotes (OK, electronic quotes) where I did. He writes:

>>Had I seen that, I would not have had a doubt the pairing was intentional. I still have a copy of the New York Times from August 8, 1974 -- one day before Richard Nixon resigned the presidency. On the front page at the bottom is a photo of Nixon, walking from the Executive Office Building to the White House, juxtaposed with an article headlined, "Many Mental Patients Simply Walk Out."

Searching for this page, which I am delighted to have found and am attaching here, I note that quite a number of articles on mental health facilities were published in the paper that summer, several making the front page. Two front-page pieces I found are adjacent to articles on Nixon, but none so juicy as the one I cite above. However, on July 31, a front-page piece by Lawrence van Gelder headlined "Mental Patient Held As Church Arsonist" is sandwiched between two articles on Watergate, one headlined "President Surrenders 11 Tapes to Sirica," the other a reproduction of the text of Impeachment Article III. Coincidence? I think not.

As a graphic designer, I'm aware the opportunities to make such a wry statement with mere page layout are rare, but the New York Times is no stranger to the practice.<<

Here's the bottom of the NYT front page that day. Thanks to Diehl for the nugget. In China they call this sort of internet-borne discovery a "human flesh search engine," as opposed to the algorithmic search engine of Google, Baidu, etc. That is, the internet creates connections, and people then apply their imagination, pattern-recognition, and wit. I'm glad to think that this latest headline was part of a grand tradition.


Here's how the whole front page looked: