Was Kanye West's Comment Really George W. Bush's Lowest Point?

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He was President the day the United States suffered its worst terror attack in history. When he learned of the attacks, he was sitting in a Florida classroom, cameras whirring, reading from the children's book, The Pet Goat.

His staffers had been warned in August 2001 of al-Qaeda plans to attack American targets via the air. If he did not know this before September 11, 2001, he was to learn it shortly thereafter. 

He misleadingly brought America into a brutal and costly war in Iraq based upon faulty intelligence. At some point along the way he was told there were, in fact, no weapons of mass destruction. 

In his name, and at his direction, American officials tortured detainees in violation of the rule of law. At some point he was shown the photographs from Abu Ghraib.

Between 1,500 and 2,000 Americans were killed as a result of Hurricane Katrina. At some point, he saw the videos of the carnage and chaos and realized his administration had not done enough.

His economic policies and lack of regulatory oversight led to a painful and ongoing recession. Near the end of his term, he surely realized the house of cards he had nurtured was crumbling.  

And yet the "low point" of George W. Bush's presidency, according to his yet-to-be-published biography, was a post-Katrina accusation by musician Kanye West that the president didn't like black people.

Are you kidding me?

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Andrew Cohen is a contributing editor at The Atlantic, 60 Minutes' first-ever legal analyst, and a fellow at the Brennan Center for Justice. He is also chief analyst for CBS Radio News and has won a Murrow Award as one of the nation's leading legal journalists. More

Cohen is the winner of the American Bar Association’s 2012 Silver Gavel Award for his Atlantic commentary about the death penalty in America and the winner of the Humane Society’s 2012 Genesis Award for his coverage of the plight of America’s wild horses. A racehorse owner and breeder, Cohen also is a two-time winner of both the John Hervey and O’Brien Awards for distinguished commentary about horse racing.

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