Lets Make Fred Phelps Into He-Who-Must-Not-Be-Named

One of Instapundit's readers writes:  "I keep wondering whether the existence of homosexuality is proof that God hates Fred Phelps."


What I'd like to know is, why can't this vast media conspiracy I keep hearing about get it together on Phelps and his rotten little band of merry madmen?  Their shameful protests at funerals are condemned by, to a first approximation, every single other person in the United States of America.  So why do they keep doing it?  Presumably because it gets them on the teevee.

So why won't the Liberal MediaTM take away their fun?  Refuse to broadcast any footage that contains their message; refuse to write about them.  If we must put them on television or in the newspaper, confine the coverage strictly to the kind of embarrassing stuff you see about stars--who at Westboro Baptist has the worst cellulite?  Who's got acne and bad teeth?

I'm guessing that after a couple of weeks of this, they'd slink back to whatever rock they live under.

Or we could just, y'know, ignore them.  Because every time we write a story about them and how terrible they are, we're making them feel important.  We're helping them reach people with their repulsive, nonsensical message.  If there were ever a time when the world needed a media conspiracy, it's now.
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Megan McArdle is a columnist at Bloomberg View and a former senior editor at The Atlantic. Her new book is The Up Side of Down.

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