Map of the Day: Moody Blues ... and Reds

Californians are carefree; New Yorkers are bitter; Southerners are cheerful; and West Virginians are angry, right? Those old stereotypes might actually have some truth, according to a new study that analyzed over three million tweets nationwide.

Harvard and Northeastern universities examined the words in people's tweets over three years and assigned "word ratings," as identified by the Center for Research of Psychophysiology. From that, they determined moods by time and location.

They found people are happier in the evenings and on the weekends nationwide, but mood did vary drastically by state. Generally speaking, people in the South and on the West Coast were happier than those in the Midwest and Northeast.

There was no red state-blue state or urban-rural divide. Californians were among the happiest while New Yorkers were the angriest. Floridians were often in good moods while Montanans were often upset.

One trend that was constant: Friday evenings were among the happiest, so we should all be in great moods in a couple of hours.


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Patrick Ottenhoff has been writing The Electoral Map blog since 2007. A former staff writer for National Journal Group and project manager at New Media Strategies, he now attends Georgetown's McDonough School of Business. More

Patrick Ottenhoff attends Georgetown McDonough School of Business in the Class of 2012. He previously served as a project manager in the Public Affairs Practice of New Media Strategies and was a staff writer for National Journal Group. Patrick has been writing The Electoral Map blog since 2007. As the name implies, the blog covers news and commentary at the intersection of politics and geography, but it also analyzes the stories, people, culture, sports, and food behind the maps and the votes. Patrick is a native Virginian and graduate of Union College in New York. You can follow The Electoral Map on Twitter and Facebook, and follow Patrick on YouTube.

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