Accounting for Poets -- and Pundits

More

David Brooks is right to defend the humanities major, but neither he, nor I, nor anybody else has yet developed a fully persuasive justification:

When the going gets tough, the tough take accounting. When the job market worsens, many students figure they can't indulge in an English or a history major. They have to study something that will lead directly to a job.

So it is almost inevitable that over the next few years, as labor markets struggle, the humanities will continue their long slide. There already has been a nearly 50 percent drop in the portion of liberal arts majors over the past generation, and that trend is bound to accelerate. Once the stars of university life, humanities now play bit roles when prospective students take their college tours. The labs are more glamorous than the libraries.

Of course this is not such a new opposition; think of Cynthia Ozick's unhappy summer stint with "Margate, Haroulian."

But who says accounting itself can't be a humanistic subject? Its history is also the story of cultural practices and the evolution of politics, commerce, and technology. The glories of Venetian art depended on the Republic's sea power, and my colleague Luca Zan has done major work on the Venetian Arsenal as the birthplace of modern management. Professor Michael Power of the LSE is a theorist of risk with philosophy as well as finance degrees, and Emory University Professors Gregory Waymire and Sudipta Basu study the archaeological record to establish accounting's role in making the first complex societies possible. There are Marxist and Foucauldian accounting theorists, and there is even a spiritual side to the profession, represented by the Rev. Keith McMillan SJ


The humanities can be, and too often are, pursued as the "systematic abuse of a terminology invented for the purpose," as a joke in the field goes. But apparently technical subjects like accounting and engineering have deep ethical aspects. The real problem isn't the lack of curricular balance; I'll bet many of the investment bankers who helped produce the current crisis actually took excellent humanities courses. It's that in practice, and in many accounting courses and programs, pure technique has too often crowded out values -- ironically, because computerization was supposed to let professionals move from routine to the big picture. The "going is tough," in Mr. Brooks' phrase, in part because too many accountants didn't.

Jump to comments
Presented by

Edward Tenner is a historian of technology and culture, and an affiliate of the Center for Arts and Cultural Policy at Princeton's Woodrow Wilson School. He was a founding advisor of Smithsonian's Lemelson Center.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

What's the Number One Thing We Could Do to Improve City Life?

A group of journalists, professors, and non-profit leaders predict the future of livable, walkable cities


Elsewhere on the web

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Adventures in Legal Weed

Colorado is now well into its first year as the first state to legalize recreational marijuana. How's it going? James Hamblin visits Aspen.

Video

What Makes a Story Great?

The storytellers behind House of CardsandThis American Life reflect on the creative process.

Video

Tracing Sriracha's Origin to Thailand

Ever wonder how the wildly popular hot sauce got its name? It all started in Si Racha.

Video

Where Confiscated Wildlife Ends Up

A government facility outside of Denver houses more than a million products of the illegal wildlife trade, from tigers and bears to bald eagles.

Video

Is Wine Healthy?

James Hamblin prepares to impress his date with knowledge about the health benefits of wine.

Video

The World's Largest Balloon Festival

Nine days, more than 700 balloons, and a whole lot of hot air

Writers

Up
Down

More in National

From This Author

Just In