World's Best Job in Journalism

More

Or, second-best, after being in the Atlantic tribe, is at the Washington Monthly magazine. My first "paying" job in the magazine world was there*, and in the long years since I've been a devoted alumnus and reader. (*Charles Peters, the founding entrepreneur/crusader/editor, filed for Chapter 11 protection a day after I signed on -- a contingency he hadn't mentioned in our previous talks. Good preparation for the necessary adaptability of the journalistic life, and still a very fortunate break to have met him, from my point of view.)

Every two years or so the latest team of young staff editors wears out and drops in the traces has learned everything that Charlie Peters and his successor Paul Glastris have to teach them, and a new team is brought in. At least one such opening is in sight at the Monthly. Details after the jump. This will be a great opportunity for someone. For another time: why I think long-term career prospects are actually bright for people in their 20s or thereabouts just getting into journalism now.

_____
From the Monthly's announcement:

Editor/Reporter

The Washington Monthly is seeking applications for an editor/reporter position that will be available soon. A sense of humor and a willingness to work long hours at low pay are required. Knowledge of politics, government and Washington a plus.

As a Monthly editor, you'll be following in the footsteps of many fine journalists who have had the same job, including: James Fallows, Nicholas Lemann, Jonathan Alter, Kate Boo, Matt Cooper, Jon Meacham, Taylor Branch, Amy Sullivan, Timothy Noah, James Bennet, Joshua Green, Michelle Cottle, Gregg Easterbrook, David Ignatius, Nick Confessore, Joe Nocera, Steven Waldman, Jason DeParle and many more.

Candidates should send a cover letter, résumé, and writing samples (not necessarily published, but showing fact-gathering and analytic ability) to:

To apply, please send the requested documents to Charles Homans: chomans at washingtonmonthly.com
Presented by

James Fallows is a national correspondent for The Atlantic and has written for the magazine since the late 1970s. He has reported extensively from outside the United States and once worked as President Carter's chief speechwriter. His latest book is China Airborne. More

James Fallows is based in Washington as a national correspondent for The Atlantic. He has worked for the magazine for nearly 30 years and in that time has also lived in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. He was raised in Redlands, California, received his undergraduate degree in American history and literature from Harvard, and received a graduate degree in economics from Oxford as a Rhodes scholar. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he has spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter, two years as the editor of US News & World Report, and six months as a program designer at Microsoft. He is an instrument-rated private pilot. He is also now the chair in U.S. media at the U.S. Studies Centre at the University of Sydney, in Australia.

Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series Doing Business in China. He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. His recent books Blind Into Baghdad (2006) and Postcards From Tomorrow Square (2009) are based on his writings for The Atlantic. His latest book is China Airborne. He is married to Deborah Fallows, author of the recent book Dreaming in Chinese. They have two married sons.

Fallows welcomes and frequently quotes from reader mail sent via the "Email" button below. Unless you specify otherwise, we consider any incoming mail available for possible quotation -- but not with the sender's real name unless you explicitly state that it may be used. If you are wondering why Fallows does not use a "Comments" field below his posts, please see previous explanations here and here.
Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

CrossFit Versus Yoga: Choose a Side

How a workout becomes a social identity


Video

CrossFit Versus Yoga: Choose a Side

How a workout becomes a social identity

Video

Is Technology Making Us Better Storytellers?

The minds behind House of Cards and The Moth weigh in.

Video

A Short Film That Skewers Hollywood

A studio executive concocts an animated blockbuster. Who cares about the story?

Video

In Online Dating, Everyone's a Little Bit Racist

The co-founder of OKCupid shares findings from his analysis of millions of users' data.

Video

What Is a Sandwich?

We're overthinking sandwiches, so you don't have to.

Video

Let's Talk About Not Smoking

Why does smoking maintain its allure? James Hamblin seeks the wisdom of a cool person.

Writers

Up
Down

More in National

From This Author

Just In