Terror Law Truths: The Denbeauxs Deserve a Medal

More

The American people owe a new wave of gratitude these days--and maybe a medal or prize-- to the Denbeaux family, Mark and Joshua, father and son, professor and lawyer, who have consistently made historic contributions to our understanding of the Bush administration's approach to terror law in the wake of 9/11. Their dogged pursuit of hidden truths has illuminated for us vital, objective facts about how the legal war on terror detainees has really been waged.

Four years ago, the team's research of the US military's own detainee records destroyed the myth that Guantanamo held the "worst of the worst." Now, the duo is back, providing the impetus for Scott Horton's pointed and powerful report in Harper's Magazine last month about an alleged military coverup at Gitmo involving the reported "suicides" of three detainees.   

Horton's new piece cuts directly against the renewed push by Republican lawmakers to keep the detainee prison at Gitmo open until terror suspects like Khalid Sheikh Mohammed are prosecuted there under tribunal rules. It directly subverts the argument that Gitmo guards and officials are as accountable as their civilian counterparts. It directly supports the Obama administration's declaration that Gitmo must be closed to end the nasty symbolism it represents to so many around the world.

In the world of law and academia, Mark and Josh Denbeaux have been roundly cited for their work. It's time the American people and their Congressional representatives tuned in, too. These are earnest, honest people whom history will favor for their brave work in untangling the many govenrment deceptions that have been thrown at the public since the Twin Towers fell.

Jump to comments
Presented by

Andrew Cohen is a contributing editor at The Atlantic. He is a legal analyst for 60 Minutes and CBS Radio News, and a fellow at the Brennan Center for Justice.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

Adventures in Legal Weed

Colorado is now well into its first year as the first state to legalize recreational marijuana. How's it going? James Hamblin visits Aspen.


Elsewhere on the web

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Adventures in Legal Weed

Colorado is now well into its first year as the first state to legalize recreational marijuana. How's it going? James Hamblin visits Aspen.

Video

What Makes a Story Great?

The storytellers behind House of CardsandThis American Life reflect on the creative process.

Video

Tracing Sriracha's Origin to Thailand

Ever wonder how the wildly popular hot sauce got its name? It all started in Si Racha.

Video

Where Confiscated Wildlife Ends Up

A government facility outside of Denver houses more than a million products of the illegal wildlife trade, from tigers and bears to bald eagles.

Video

Is Wine Healthy?

James Hamblin prepares to impress his date with knowledge about the health benefits of wine.

Video

The World's Largest Balloon Festival

Nine days, more than 700 balloons, and a whole lot of hot air

Writers

Up
Down

More in National

Just In