October 2011

The Atlantic - October 2011

How the NCAA is exploiting players, Russia's Silicon Valley, political sex scandals, and more

Features

  • The Shame of College Sports

    The Shame of College Sports

    College quarterbacks are denounced for partying with agents or trading autographs for tattoos, but the real scandal is the NCAA’s fundamentally unjust concept of amateurism.

    Debate: Join athletes, administrators, legal experts, and journalists in discussing what's wrong with the NCAA.

  • Sex and the Married Politician

    Sex and the Married Politician

    As the list of politicos laid low by sexual scandal grows longer, history offers lessons on when the press should opt for exposure—and when it should leave well enough alone.

  • The Next Russian Revolution

    The Next Russian Revolution

    Outside Moscow, the Kremlin is making plans for a Russian Silicon Valley. But while tech companies are on board, the Russian people are less enthusiastic.

  • The Idea Factory

    What happens when you gather the world’s most imaginative minds under one roof?

    Interview: The new director of the MIT Media Lab explains why he values interdisciplinary brainstorming and creative art

    Slideshow: Futuristic cars, musical video games, bionic legs. These are just a few of the cutting-edge innovations to come from the MIT Media Lab.

  • Where the Skills Are

    In today’s expanding cities, social skills are becoming ever more essential to economic growth.

Dispatches

Columns

Books

Editor's Note

Poetry

Advice

Video

I Am an Undocumented Immigrant

"I look like a typical young American."

Video

Juice Cleanses: The Worst Diet

A doctor tries the ever-popular Master Cleanse. Sort of.

Video

Why Did I Study Physics?

Using hand-drawn cartoons to explain an academic passion

Video

What If Emoji Lived Among Us?

A whimsical ad imagines what life would be like if emoji were real.

Video

Living Alone on a Sailboat

"If you think I'm a dirtbag, then you don't understand the lifestyle."

Writers

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