November 2009

The Atlantic - November 2009

Shannon Brownlee and Jeanne Lenzer question the effectiveness of the H1N1 vaccine; Wayne Curtis on the houses of the future; Brave Thinkers—twenty-seven people with courageous ideas; Nadya Labi on the business of retrieving abducted children; Benjamin Schwarz on Mad Men; and much more.

Features

  • Does the Vaccine Matter?

    To prevent a devastating flu pandemic, the government is relying heavily on vaccines and antivirals. Some experts say that both are quite possibly useless.

    Q&A: The authors answer questions about H1N1 diagnosis and immunity.

  • Houses of the Future

    Houses of the Future

    In New Orleans, a new kind of house is rising from the ruins of Katrina. Cheap, green, and radically hip, it may change architecture for a generation.

    Interactive Map: Explore the new homes described in Wayne Curtis's story

  • Brave Thinkers

    Twenty-seven people with courageous ideas—from relocating endangered species to hiring autistics to printing loads of money—that are shaping our future. The first installment of an annual feature.

    Video: Watch mini-documentaries about the Brave Thinkers featured in this issue and submit your own nominations

  • The Snatchback

    The Snatchback

    When Todd Hopson wanted to get Andres, the 9-year-old boy he'd raised from infancy, back from his biological father in Costa Rica, he called Gus Zamora, who retrieves internationally abducted children for a living. Here’s what happened next.

    Sidebar: The author explains how she ended up following Gus Zamora around the globe

    Audio: Labi’s sound recording of the actual snatchback in Costa Rica (with transcript)

Dispatches

Books

Columns

Also in this issue

Poetry

Video

The 86-Year-Old Farmer Who Won't Quit

A filmmaker returns to his hometown to profile the patriarch of a family farm

Video

Riding Unicycles in a Cave

"If you fall down and break your leg, there's no way out."

Video

Carrot: A Pitch-Perfect Satire of Tech

"It's not just a vegetable. It's what a vegetable should be."

Video

An Ingenious 360-Degree Time-Lapse

Watch the world become a cartoonishly small playground

Video

The Benefits of Living Alone on a Mountain

"You really have to love solitary time by yourself."

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