September 2008

The Atlantic - September 2008

James Fallows assesses the debating skills of McCain and Obama; Joshua Green offers a look at some revealing Hillary Clinton campaign memos; Lisa Margonelli on how termites could save us from global warming; Robert D. Kaplan on Burma; Caitlin Flanagan reflects on Patty Hearst's kidnapping and '70s-era Berkeley; Christopher Hitchens on Norman Mailer; Andrew Sullivan on gay marriage; Corby Kummer tries cooking school in the Greek Islands; and much more.

Features

  • Rhetorical Questions

    Who will win the presidential debates? What does each candidate’s use of words say about how he would govern as president? Can Obama’s rhetorical skills lift him to the heights of Lincoln, FDR, and Reagan—or will his speechmaking do him in? After watching all 47 (!) of the primary season’s debates, our correspondent has the answers—and some harsh criticism for the moderators.

  • Reconcilable Differences

    Obama and McCain both say they want to usher in a new, less divisive brand of politics. Which of them has the better chance? Is bipartisanship still possible?

  • The Front-Runner’s Fall

    Hillary Clinton’s campaign was undone by a clash of personalities more toxic than anyone imagined. E-mails and memos—published here for the first time—reveal the backstabbing and conflicting strategies that produced an epic meltdown.

    Memos: A complete index to the internal communications referenced in "The Front-Runner's Fall"

  • Gut Reactions

    The termite’s stomach, of all things, has become the focus of large-scale scientific investigations. Could the same properties that make the termite such a costly pest help us solve global warming? [Web only: Video: "How to Hunt for Termites"]

  • Lifting the Bamboo Curtain

    As China and India vie for power and influence, Burma has become a strategic battleground. Four Americans with deep ties to this fractured, resource-rich country illuminate its current troubles, and what the U.S. should do to shape its future.

    From the Archives: A look back at a 70-page supplement on Burma—covering arts, culture, politics, and more—written mostly by Burmese and published by The Atlantic in 1958.

Agenda

Books

Also in this issue

Poetry

Video

Adventures in Legal Weed

Colorado is now well into its first year as the first state to legalize recreational marijuana. How's it going? James Hamblin visits Aspen.

Video

What Makes a Story Great?

The storytellers behind House of CardsandThis American Life reflect on the creative process.

Video

Tracing Sriracha's Origin to Thailand

Ever wonder how the wildly popular hot sauce got its name? It all started in Si Racha.

Video

Where Confiscated Wildlife Ends Up

A government facility outside of Denver houses more than a million products of the illegal wildlife trade, from tigers and bears to bald eagles.

Video

Is Wine Healthy?

James Hamblin prepares to impress his date with knowledge about the health benefits of wine.

Video

The World's Largest Balloon Festival

Nine days, more than 700 balloons, and a whole lot of hot air

Writers

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