December 2006

The Atlantic - December 2006

The Atlantic Top 100 list; William Langewiesche, "How to Get a Nuclear Bomb"; Hanna Rosin on the commercialization of yoga, James Fallows on life in contemporary China; Christopher Buckley's letter from 2008; Michael Hirschorn considers the future of the newspaper; Benjamin Schwarz selects the books of the year; and much more.

Features

  • They Made America

    Who are the most influential figures in American history? The Atlantic recently asked ten eminent historians. The result was The Atlantic’s Top 100—and some insight into the nature of influence and the contingency of history. Was Walt Disney really more influential than Elizabeth Cady Stanton? Benjamin Spock than Richard Nixon? Elvis Presley than Lewis and Clark? John D. Rockefeller than Bill Gates? Babe Ruth than Frank Lloyd Wright? Let the debates begin.

  • How to Get a Nuclear Bomb

    It wouldn’t be easy. But it wouldn’t be impossible. A reporter travels the world to find the weaknesses a terrorist could exploit

  • Postcards From Tomorrow Square

    Our man in Shanghai samples budget beer, survives subway scrimmages, and starts living the contradictions of China’s breakneck modernization

  • Striking a Pose

    Fifty years ago, yoga was the province of California communes and fringy New Agers. Now it’s teetering on the brink of overexposure and commodification. So, is it a spiritual antidote to the upscale Western lifestyle, or just the latest manifestation?

    Interviews: Hanna Rosin, the author of "Striking a Pose," discusses yoga's journey from Himalayan mountaintops to the studio down the street.

  • American Icons

    This is the eleventh in a series of archival excerpts in honor of the magazine's 150th anniversary. This installment is introduced by Mark Bowden, an Atlantic national correspondent.

Agenda

Books

Pursuits

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Poetry

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The Best 71-Second Animation You'll Watch Today

A rock monster tries to save a village from destruction.

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The Case for Napping at Work

Most Americans don't get enough sleep. More and more employers are trying to help address that.

Video

A Four-Dimensional Tour of Boston

In this groundbreaking video, time moves at multiple speeds within a single frame.

Video

Who Made Pop Music So Repetitive? You Did.

If pop music is too homogenous, that's because listeners want it that way.

Video

Stunning GoPro Footage of a Wildfire

In the field with America’s elite Native American firefighting crew

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