June 2006

The Atlantic - June 2006

Jeffrey Rosen, "The Day After Roe"; Milton Viorst, "The Education of Ali al-Timimi"; Matthew Stewart, "The Management Myth"; Joshua Green, "The New War Over Wal-Mart"; Fred Kaplan on our military future in Iraq; Corby Kummer on sweet tea; Caitlin Flanagan on how to treat the help; and much more.

Features

  • The Day After Roe

    If the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade, it will set off tectonic shifts in the American political landscape not seen since the civil-rights movement—or perhaps even the Civil War

    Interviews: Jeffrey Rosen, the author of the June cover story, on what Roe v. Wade has done to the country, and what might happen without it

  • The Education of Ali Al-Timimi

    Describing him as a “rock star” of Islamic fundamentalism in the United States, the government sent an American Muslim scientist to prison for life. But has justice been served?

    Interviews: Milton Viorst on the path that brought his son's childhood friend from a middle-class American upbringing to life imprisonment for conspiracy to commit "violent jihad"

  • The Management Myth

    Most of management theory is inane, writes our correspondent, the founder of a consulting firm. If you want to succeed in business, don’t get an M.B.A. Study philosophy instead

  • A Russian Soldier’s Story

    Two years in the life of Kiril Bobrov—a parable of the once-proud, now-rotting Russian army

  • Women’s Empowerment

    This is the fifth in a series of archival excerpts in honor of the magazine’s 150th anniversary. This installment is introduced by Terry Castle, a professor of English at Stanford. Her books include The Apparitional Lesbian and Courage, Mon Amie

Agenda

Books

Pursuits

Also in this issue

Poetry

Video

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

Video

Pittsburgh: 'Better Than You Thought'

How Steel City became a bikeable, walkable paradise

Video

A Four-Dimensional Tour of Boston

In this groundbreaking video, time moves at multiple speeds within a single frame.

Video

Who Made Pop Music So Repetitive? You Did.

If pop music is too homogenous, that's because listeners want it that way.

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